The Quest for Nutritional Truth: Why I Eat the Way I Eat

At this point, I’ve tried writing this post over half a dozen times. I’ve promised it for so long, I’ve decided to finally hammer it out, no matter the cost. I feel good though. My head is clear, and I’ve done enough writing lately that I feel I can organize my thoughts clearly, logically, and passionately.

Let’s begin by analyzing why this post has been so hard to write for me.

In short, “nutrition” is an important topic to me. It’s something I have been heavily interested in for many years now, have spent a lot of time (as in hundreds, if not thousands of hours) reading about, and had many different experiences as I tried nearly everything under the sun that caught my attention in the field.

We could summarize all that as, I’ve invested a lot personally into the subject – both intellectually, and in real life actions taken.

But, it doesn’t end there. The second reason it’s taken me so long to write this post, is that I understand just how deeply the way we eat permeates the rest of our lives.

And what’s more, I’ve seen dietary choices affect those I love most.

Many people scoff at the idea (including many Md’s) that nutrition can affect serious dis-eases, including cancer. Diet is a distant second behind conventional medicine and treatments, and often, even the severely abused term “exercise” is a step above dietary choices for health issues such as obesity and heart disease.

Paradoxically, it plays such a vital role in many cases, that it makes conventional medicine/treatment borderline irrelevant. Artificially meddling with “cholesterol levels” via statins being a prime example.

And in the case of my best friend, who died of cancer barely a year ago, the lack of proper nutrition literally caused his treatments to kill him, after transforming his once visibly health body, into something akin to a walking skeleton.

I actually watched him eat copious amounts of brownies, shark bites, various candies and other pastries, not two weeks before his death. He was literally ravenous for carbohydrate – carbohydrate that was feeding his ever faster spreading cancer – which baffled his doctors.

But why was this baffling? His doctors knew that there was a high chance of his cancer spreading and growing to other organs after “treatment”. You would think they would recommend removing the source of nutrients cancer would need to grow further and spread to other organs – nutrients that your body literally does not require for health.

It makes perfect sense, but of course, this was never mentioned to him, either due to ignorance or unwarranted skepticism to other medical doctors who have been shouting for far too long in a room full of sheeple.

Which brings us to our next point – can a 21 year old* possibly know more about the practical application of proper nutrition than thousands of medical doctors, the United States government, and state licensed dietitians?

The answer to this question will surprise some, and be completely obvious to others (I’m doubting there will be many people in between).

Yes.

*I’m willing to bet the majority of readers on this very blog know more than the mentioned “experts” and institutions – and not because they read this blog, but because they are constantly thinking for themselves and doing their own research on the critical issue of nutrition (among others I imagine).

It’s not a matter of who knows “more” either, as some may assume. Regarding real life application of eating properly, it is a black and white matter. Mass consensus from those in positions we view as having authority, is not “wrong” in a harmless or neutral sense – they are wrong on a level that is detrimental to your (and those who are close to you) immediate well being, life expectancy, functional ability, daily energy, and virtually any aspect of life you can even remotely link to the term “health”, and even on a societal level (think of the far reaching effects of childhood obesity and diabetes).

All the same applies to “exercise”. While I don’t claim to know everything, I can tell you that the consensus from those in positions of fame and authority is detrimental to all of the same points listed above. People like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Tony Horton, Christian Bale, Brad Pitt, and your family doctor, spout off information that is at best a waste of time, and more often than not, literally harmful to your body.

This is not to attack of those people personally, as I imagine they are all well intentioned (and truly believe in what they say). Never the less, the information they provide is essentially useless on the topic of exercise (and nutrition), and as the saying goes, “The road to hell is paved with good intentions”.

The knee-jerk response to this is often times a defense of those we look up to, likely due to a personal investment in the advice given by those celebrities/persons of status. Some may even say this is conspiracy nonsense.

To think that the US government does not have my personal health in their interests? And that “fit” and “cut” celebrities give advice that is not only useless, but harmful? And my doctor?

“Please, this guy must be nuts.”

The reality is that this is not a conspiracy, of course. It’s simply human psychology and errors in thinking/observation on a grand scale.

Celebrity A does X workout program for Y movie. Celebrity A looks “ripped” in Y movie, therefore his actions must be the direct source of his success.

Of course, this is not true. Correlation does not equal causation, and disregarding the infinite number of other variables during X workout program is simply insane.

In the case of doctors and licensed dietitians, the situation is more a matter of reading nutritional dogma for many years and never being exposed to an opinion that counters the accepted norm. Combine that with not wanting to risk one’s self financially by deviating from the prescribed norm, and you have self perpetuating sheeple thinking being distributed like candy on Halloween.

Some may still have a problem with listening to a 21 year old without a college degree over their doctor who has been through many years of schooling. To those people, I ask you not to listen to me, but to yourself. Think critically about the current state of affairs in the United States.

Our health and physical shape is literally falling apart (please visit your local Super Wal-Mart for visible examples).

Does the answer really lie in the information the masses present? Have we really just not listened to the (mystical) information that is presented with biased, shady, or no science at all to back it?

Is it wise to ignore our own contradictions regarding health, nutrition, and exercise?

My favorite being that physical activity “works up an appetite”, yet “exercise” somehow makes you thin (random physical activity does not equate to “exercise”).

My personal experiences, research, and applied logic, have resulted in a resounding NO to these questions. While specifics of “proper nutrition” may differ from opinion to opinion, I believe all individuals who strive to think rationally and are willing to deviate from the norm, will also come to the same conclusion – that most everything popular, is wrong.

In the case of our dietary choices (and exercise choices), everything popular is really, really, wrong.

What is “food”?

Relax, we’re getting to the good part =).

What is food I ask?

It seems to be a term few (if any) have tried to define, or even contemplated defining. Much like the terms “health”, “fitness”, and even “exercise”.

We all have our individual definitions of these terms, even if they are unconscious and never actively thought about (I will assume this is most people any of us have ever met).

The assumed definition most people have for “exercise” as an example, is any sort of random physical activity. By this definition, flicking on a light switch would be considered exercise. This sounds ridiculous of course, but I kid you not – this is where the unspoken logic behind this definition points.

Some may add that “anything that makes you sweat” should be considered exercise (I imagine someone like Tony Horton would say such a thing along with other fitness “gurus” and “celebrities”). Of course this logic would also include defecating in a moderately warm environment.

Of course, no one wants to discuss these unconscious assumptions and double standards for our collective logic on these concepts, but indeed, this is where they point.

All the same applies to the term “food”. I imagine most would be quick to define food as “anything that humans or animals eat”.

Yeah, this sounds pretty good…right?

Of course, this is also false. Your favorite book is not food for your dog, and Elmer’s glue is not food for children in pre-school.

“But of course not, it has to be something nutritious

That little addition however, solves nothing. I imagine most people could eat some loose leaf paper or cardboard, and get by without any life threatening problems. And of course, there will be some “nutrients” in those items.

Most people will comprehend that that those items are not “food”, that I must be joking. However, I am not. Welcome to the world of processed foods, grain, corn, wheat, soybeans, the oils of these plants, and to a slightly lesser extent, the vast majority of legumes (beans).

I equate these things to cardboard (some processed foods may be excluded however as that is a bit of an over generalization, pemmican I purchased recently being an example).

In some cases tasty, and attractive looking cardboard – but the dietary equivalent of cardboard none the less. They literally have zero place in the human diet for every day purposes. Even in an extended survival situation, they are an extremely poor choice. You would be far better off eating bugs and small animals, as gross as it sounds (unless you happen to enjoy eating squirrels).

But don’t those “substances” provide nutrients?

No, not really. Any minimal nutrition brought on by the ill-advised consumption of corn, soy, wheat, beans, and their oils, is heavily outweighed by it’s profound poisoning effect (that most are completely in the dark about) and spikes in insulin that are foreign to your body, or at best, should be exceedingly rare (and have been for a few million years now).

Okay, but hold on a second, grain and beans are the foundation of what most people on the planet currently eat. Are you suggesting that the basis of the human diet, including on a grand scale, should be something else, such as animals? If so, isn’t that harmful for the environment?

Yes, I am suggesting that the basis of our diets need to be animals. I must not care about the environment or animals then right?

Wrong.

I for one am convinced that not only is the consumption of animals better for us, but also the environment, and (paradoxically), even animals themselves.

This of course, sounds preposterous, especially to PETA fans and other vegans/vegetarians.

But I won’t stop there. I’ll go so far as to say that vegans and vegetarians are the biggest contributors to animal cruelty, and environmental damage, to have ever existed. Cruelly ironic and (I imagine) angering to most vegetarians?

Yes, but never the less, it is the truth. I don’t say the following lightly either.

The farming of corn, soy, and wheat, are literally, the seeds of our own doom. People worry about all sorts of nonsense for an impending apocalypse, but few ever stop to consider our addiction and dependence, as a species, on these fragile substances.

Imagine a world where 7 billion people were dependent on nutritionally devoid/poisonous substances for “food” (that are killing us off by the millions and quite literally don’t belong on the planet in the case of corn), that in the process of producing, cause horrendous damage to “the environment”, and each passing day, cause society to be ever more dependent on them.

Now imagine that world when a disease or severe weather crippled those “crops” (again, corn shouldn’t exist, so it’s difficult to cal it a crop).

In the undeveloped world, you would have millions of people go from hungry or already starving, to dead.

In the (over) developed world, you would have hundreds of millions of people on each continent experience food rationing/shortages of previous food stores, before outright civil unrest broke out (which would be pretty quick once news spread that it will be a very long time until significant quantities of “food” were produced*).

*Combine this with the fact that most people become ravenously hungry after only a few hours due to their carbohydrate addiction/weak ability to produce ketone bodies.

This is hard to imagine in the “developed” world, with all of our technology, communication, industry and so on – but I assure you those “crops” are the basis of the vast, vast majority of “food” currently available.

You would see the richest, most powerful countries in the world, disintegrate almost overnight. People would kill over food.

Think not? Look at every situation in recent history when things got “bad”. People will shoot each other over TV’s and electronics, let alone to feed their kids and family.

In fact, who said a valid reason was required for irrational behavior? I’ve seen people first hand become violent and smash heads into curbs, over nothing.

Now, this is a pretty dark picture we’ve painted, and the chances may be slim. But how slim is anyone’s guess. In any case, there is absolutely no telling what will happen in the years to come with our fragile beyond comprehension production of food.

A bit of a tangent from the definition of “food”, but I feel that it is relative. If interested further, I recommend reading up on famines in the not so distant past (especially Ireland).

Taking a few steps back, what about being vegetarian and not eating the previously discussed items?

Eating nothing but nuts, vegetables, fruits, some seeds, and so on. Wouldn’t that be the best course of action for people and animals (nutrition aside for the moment)?

Being a person who was “paleo-vegan” for a while, I can tell you the answer is most certainly no. This is a downright bastardization of the way we are meant to eat. These items are “foods” by my standards, but are a far cry from the versions we evolved eating. Modern agriculture has eliminated much of the little nutrients these foods once had.

Going further, in most cases, these items constituted a relatively small part of our diet. In some cases, they were even non-existent (Eskimos come to mind). In other cases, plant foods may have played a significant role in diet.

However, these are the exceptions, not the rules – the same way some plant foods are more suited to our dietary needs than others (coconut versus a watermelon for example, which is basically sugar water).

Perhaps the most clear cut reasoning that eating “paleo-vegan” (plants excluding grains and the majority of beans) is an unwise idea is that there is no such thing as a plant that is necessary to eat.

Of course the same could be said about animals, except that you do need to eat at least some animal products to survive and remain free of disease/deficiencies (removing modern technology/food processing from the picture).

Our bodies are literally engineered to need animals. Think about it, how could focusing on foods that are …

  • not required
  • contain few nutrients (especially in the face of currently available plant products)
  • contain large amounts of the macro-nutrient that is unnecessary for consumption and for millions of years, on a grand scale, was the rarest to be consumed

… possibly be healthy?

While nutrients vary from animal to animal (and have certainly been affected by the modern practice of corn/soy feeding), animals were the only universal source of food available to the human race for millions of years.

An apple, an avocado, a watermelon, and starchy tuber are all very different foods.

Ask yourself (even with no formal knowledge of nutrition), how different is the meat of a lamb from the meat of a steer?

The meat and eggs of a chicken, and turkey?

A grouper, and snapper?

The differences are there, yes … but in comparison to a coconut and watermelon?

The difference is night and day. As a direct result, our bodies solely require the consumption of animals. Nothing else is even possible.

Considering this, is it really reasonable to assume that the only sustainable way to feed our population is by diametrically opposing what nature intended us to eat in the first place?

This to me, sounds preposterous, and arrogant, no matter the choice in plants (even removing grains/beans from the picture does not solve the problem).

But this is exactly what vegans/vegetarians would have you believe. I have even met “raw foodists” (who eat some meat) who think that plants are somehow the best decision on a grand scale for the planet, and that raising animals is destructive for the environment.

“They use way more water than plants!”

“Animals release “greenhouse” gases and will drown us all Water World style!”

These notions of course, are ridiculous. Mono-crop agriculture is many times more harmful than the sustainable raising of animals (without corn, soy, and all the related problems for the animal).

Anything to do with “global warming” and the fear mongering of the icecaps melting is blatant propaganda they have mentally sunk their teeth into, so much so they are now “fighting” for it.

“Fighting” for it so hard in fact, that they are contributing to whatever real world problems that cause purportedly hopes to solve.

The same concept applies to all fields actually – extremes become their inverses in due time – especially politics and government … but that is a discussion for another time.

The plus side to this little principle though is that once an individual becomes aware of it in one field, it spills over into other areas of interest. As I just mentioned, connecting the dots with nutrition and food production, spilled over to government and politics. The same can be said of exercise, and so on.

Extended Q and A

As if there hasn’t been enough fictional questions and answers in this article already, I’m going to wrap it up with some more, in a more obvious fashion. It’s sort of stream of thought and not in any particular order, but if you do have a specific question, it should be answered in this section. If not feel free to comment, ask, and I’ll be happy to answer or point you in the right direction.

So, all this theory … but what do I eat?!

It’s simple, mostly animals. Your specific goals/ambitions regarding dietary choices are irrelevant. The bulk of your diet should be animals. And by “bulk”, I mean as much as you want percentage wise – including 100.

There is absolutely no physical need for plants in your diet. Most of us can tolerate small or moderate amounts, some can’t. For anyone with any family history of serious disease*, including heart disease, diabetes (especially), various forms of cancer, and other “diseases of civilization”, I recommend eating little to none at all.

No one can conclusively prove either way if a little is more beneficial or not than none, but you’re best bet in this case is to only eat plants sparingly, as “condiments” as Kurt Harris has said.

*In the case of any sort of stomach/digestive problem, including celiacs disease, “heartburn”, irritable bowel syndrome, chron’s disease, you should be eating nothing but animals, and as close to “zero” carbohydrate as is possible. In other words, if I had any of these problems, I would have to be bat shit crazy to continue to eat grains/beans, and would be turning a blind eye if I continued to eat any measurable amount of plant food. I do not suffer from these diseases, however.

This sounds difficult, but it is not. In fact at this point, I feel that I have to go out of my way in my daily life to eat any plant foods (grain and beans are especially easy to avoid once you think of them as cardboard). It is literally a hassle and I have no desire to eat them.

In fact when I do eat any significant amount of vegetables/nuts/fruit, I quickly lose my appetite for them in favor of meat/animals. It’s a strange feeling to still be hungry but not want to put anymore of what you once considered “food” in your mouth.

I do like carrot cake though, and key lime pie, and chocolate chip cookies. These things make me feel like absolute crap though after eating them (now). And every time I consume them, I am reminded as such. And guess what? The interval between eating these “foods” grows bigger every time I do decide to have a bite.

What was once a one time per month habit, is now “a month or two”. Even that is a stretch – I think the last time I had key lime pie was August or September.

Anything more specific?

Yes. I wrote this post, and it includes pictures. I like lamb shank best. Steak is a close second. I like poultry as well, but it’s usually not fatty enough for me, and I end up adding additional fat such as pasture fed butter, coconut oil, and macadamia nut oil. The “dark” meat of birds is a bit moister, but still not up to par with “red meats”.

Eggs are great. I’m actually on the hunt for turkey eggs from a local farmer. Can’t wait.

I still have the shake on occasion in the post, but not as often. My taste for meat has grown, my taste for The Dream Shake has dwindled.

I like fish as well, usually the less fattier ones however. Salmon for example, is “ok”, but I’ll take a grouper, snapper, red fish, mahi mahi, or snook fillet any day over salmon. I catch these myself more often than not however, and rarely buy fish from a store.

If you do, make sure it is wild caught, and preferably from somewhere around the US (and not from somewhere in Asia where “wild caught” may mean “wild” in a pen where the fish is fed corn, soy and other nonsense).

Grouper and Dolphin (mahi mahi) are plentiful around Florida from example, and to the furthest extent of my knowledge, are always “wild caught”, and never farm raised on grain/beans.

Some may be wondering about lobster/shrimp/crab various shellfish. I think these are fine, but probably not the wisest idea to make them the bulk of your diet. I don’t find them especially tasty however, so if you do, I recommend looking into the issue further yourself.

What about dairy?

A great article on “dairy” can be found here. My personal, short version, is that the fat is excellent when coming from a good pasture fed, pasteurized source. You can eat it “raw” too, but I don’t see the point. “Ultra pasteurized” is not as good. Still better than adding carbohydrate to your coffee, but regular pasteurized cream tastes light years better than “ultra”, and as far as I understand, is better for you.

I eat some cheese. I think it’s fine, and I don’t have any problems with it unless I eat a horrendous amount. If you do have any noticeable problems with cheese, don’t eat it.

Again, the fat is excellent though.

But our ancestors didn’t eat dairy! Oh no!

If you think about it, they probably did on rare occasions. After all, why waste an animal mother’s milk if you’re starving?

But never the less, remove the carbohydrate and the rest of it just so happens to fit into the puzzle that is the human diet. Kind of like coconut (mostly the fat). Our entire race didn’t evolve eating coconut … it just so happens it’s nutrient makeup “works” for us, fairly well.

The same can be said for “milk”. It’s abundant, and has the added benefit of coming from an animal.

You mentioned coffee … is that “okay”?

I can’t prove so, but probably. There isn’t really anything “in” coffee. As far as I’m concerned, it adds a little flavor to my heavy cream, and has some caffeine in it. In short, the negative lime light surrounding “coffee” is overblown. The real issue lies with all of the nonsense people pour into it, including soy, corn, copious amounts of carbohydrate, and frankenstein sweeteners.

Most people also avoid, at all costs, putting the one thing into their coffee that has any real nutritional value – heavy cream.

I also add vanilla bean powder to it sometimes. It’s expensive, but good, and goes well with the other condiment in the drink (the other condiment being coffee).

It’s much better than Vanilla extract too, since it has no alcohol in it (I find the alcohol to ruin the taste of my coffee).

What about things like eggnog and ice cream?

You can actually make these without anything horrible in them. I made egg nog myself not long ago, including water, heavy cream, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla powder. Tasted pretty good, but I could definitely use some practice with the process =).

I haven’t made ice cream, but the same applies – just add whatever flavor you want to it and “roll” with it (assuming you already know how to make ice cream). I’ve read that adding whey helps with the consistency, however.

What else should I be drinking?

Water, water, and uh … water.

Carbonated drinks are completely out, as are “sports” drinks packed with mind boggling amounts of sugar (actually a poisonous derivative of corn in most cases). Coffee is cool, just make sure it’s actually “coffee” and not something else packed with all sorts of trash.

Tea is fine too, I just hate the taste.

Fruit juice is just sugar and water (as are fruits, basically). Lemons and limes are fine to add to water at restaurants though, if you like the taste.

Regarding the quality of water, most bottled water sucks, and so does your tap. I recommend buying the best water bottle on the planet. I use it religiously. The water is filtered to hell and back, and tastes great. I put the water through a Brita or reverse osmosis filter as well before using the bottle, on most occasions (but not always).

It’s not cheap, but it’s not really expensive either. One purchase and it will last for years … (months for the carbon filter though, which improves taste and further filters the water).

Regarding the consumption of alcohol, it’s poison. I have never drank as an adult, so I nearly forgot to mention this, but stay away from it as often as possible, or completely.

Let’s step back for a second, I need to get this straight – I can live fine, my entire life, without ANY carbohydrate?

Yes. You’re body “needs it”, but does not need to consume it, if that makes any sense (it makes it’s own). Read about if further here.

There are essential fatty acids, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals, but no necessary (dietary) carbohydrates (or anything they happen to contain). Anyone telling you different is either misinformed, lying to you, or a combination of the two.

But what about FIBER?! Don’t I need it?

Oh god, hellllll no you don’t. This myth is so bogus I hardly know what to say on the matter. This post by Danny Roddy covers “fiber” quite well however.

As an interesting side note (this is gonna be blunt so you may want to skip to the next question), most of what people crap out, is plant fiber and other nonsense they decided to put into their mouths. I kid you not, like 90% of it.

You’ll be shocked at how little you defecate eating nothing but animals. Now think about all the nutrients you get from food your body actually absorbs … instead of craps out.

Poop for thought eh?

😉

What about “anti-oxidants”, don’t I “need” those?

No, you do not need them. Can foods packed with them be beneficial? Maybe, maybe not. I really don’t have the answer. I find berries, nuts, and extremely dark chocolate more tolerable than other plant foods though (especially when I cover them in a ridiculous amount of heavy cream). I never focus on eating “anti-oxidants” though. Doing so would result in a lot of carbohydrate – no thank you.

Also, keep in mind there is a lot of dogma surrounding “anti-oxidants”, so tread carefully if you’re going to suggest to a friend that all those “anti-oxidants” he/she is gorging on, isn’t really doing much of anything.

I suspect this will be a point of contention for many paleo fans actually as “anti oxidants” are one of the few points of conventional wisdom that fit into “paleo” eating (as rushing between exercises fulfills “cardio” dogma).

Taking quite a few steps back, is eating animals really better for the environment than eating plants, especially grains/beans?

Yep. Vegetarians will fight you to the death on this one. There is probably a little room for debate when both agree that the farming of corn, soy, and wheat is one of the most destructive practices to ever take place in history for the planet, though.

Regardless, anyone telling you that “plants” are better than “animals” for the environment, is totally clueless on the issue (see here for more info).

Shifting our food production from mono-crop agriculture to the sustainable raising of animals is probably not the easiest task to accomplish, and will cause a lot of friction – but the dark alternative outlined earlier is far worse, and a very real possibility on our current track.

The benefits are high too, if we have the collective balls to pull it off. The best way to do this?

Vote with your money, and your dietary choices.

Buy meat that is raised without grain/beans, and instead, eats the food it was meant to*. It’s better for the animals, and better for you come dinner time.

*Livestock, like humans, get sick eating grain and beans. What a surprise. Feeding animals corn and soy also messes up the nutritional content of the meat/eggs you end up consuming.

What about “organic” foods? Should I be buying them?

The real issue with animal foods lies in the food they eat. First and foremost, search for animals foods that are NOT fed corn, soy, and other nonsense. These animals are usually treated well, and are not subject to growth hormone and anti-biotics (because they aren’t getting sick in the first place, what a novel concept right?).

The farmer just isn’t paying for the “organic” certification, which is expensive for him, and kind of screws him in the ass.

All that said, treat “organic” as a distant second. In the case of heavy cream for example, at least the animal will have not been subject to anti-biotics and growth hormone. The nutrients in the cream wont be “perfect”, but close enough.

I have some form of diabetes, will eating mostly (or all) animal food cure/help me?

Yes.

Carbohydrate is by far the biggest stimulator of insulin. Remove it from the diet long term, and most diabetics will cease to have any health problems.

It really is that simple despite what mainstream medicine and media would like us to believe.

However, insulin is still required by the body for various purposes (including the digestion of protein). If your body completely and permanently lacks the ability to secrete insulin, removing carbohydrate from the diet is still your best bet, but it’s highly unlikely to “cure” you completely. You still need insulin, it’s unavoidable.

I want to build muscle and/or lose fat, is eating this way ideal to do so?

As I stated previously, individual goals/ambitions regarding dietary choices are irrelevant (on a foundational level). Eating mostly, or just animals, is the basis of a “proper” diet. Nothing else even comes close to making sense.

Once you’re doing that, then it’s time to tinker with macro nutrient ratios (which should always be at least 50% fat, mostly saturated), calorie intake, fasting, and so on.

Build the base, go from there.

And while this warrants a separate discussion, I will add that from my experience, building muscle is more a matter of calorie intake, than macro-nutrient ratio (assuming carbohydrate is minimal or entirely eliminated).

Is this diet optimal for “health” and longevity?

For health, absolutely. For fat loss, absolutely. For building muscle, absolutely. For longevity … it’s hard to prove either way.

My guess is yes, and I’ll let you know for sure in the after life.

The China Study says different of course, but then again that’s probably one of the worst books I’ve ever had the unfortunate chance to lay eyes upon. It’s about as valid as studies done that conclude “running preserves joint health”. Studies done by looking at “life long runners”, and ignoring the infinitely large graveyard of people who dropped out 10, 20, 30, and 40 years earlier due to bone/joint and other health problems.

Going further, I find it folly to think that we can’t have our cake and eat it too. This is a scarcity mentality that permeates most areas of life, that I can have one thing, and not another (with the inverse being true, such as with obese people performing “cardio” while continuing to eat junk).

My experience has repeatedly been that if I use my brain and think critically about a subject, that there is a way to have the best of both worlds. To think that one diet supports health now, and not longevity … just seems asinine to me. Or that one diet supports muscle growth, and not overall health.

These things are interrelated, in my opinion, period.

What about all that saturated fat and cholesterol, isn’t it going to “clog my arteries” and kill me?

Nope.

The idea that you can eat something that will directly end up in you’re heart is laughable and has no scientific foundation as far as I am aware. This is a serious myth that has permeated every corner of western society though, and a very destructive one at that.

If you want the “criminal” responsible for 99% of heart attacks over the last 50 years, look no further than the shunning of saturated fat and cholesterol, and their replacement with corn/soy and other grain/bean oils.

This notion has literally killed tens of millions of people, perhaps even more if you connect it to issues outside of heart disease (of which, it certainly plays a role).

It really sucks, and I encourage everyone to lead by example for their friends and family by never shying away from eating foods rich in animal fat and cholesterol. Most people will initially scoff at the breaking from a societal norm, but many in a long enough time span will become curious, and ask questions about your choice (and this is a far better option than forcing this kind of information down someone’s throat).

For a good primer on saturated fat, check this article out by Mark Sisson, or read The Primal Blueprint (a print book).

Have any thoughts on nutrition as it relates to working out?

Yep, check it out.

How often should I eat? I’ve heard eating frequently is “good”.

It’s probably splitting hairs once carbohydrate is drastically reduced or eliminated from your diet, but ideally not very often. It just doesn’t make sense to do so from an evolutionary standpoint, and after a few weeks of eating little or no carbohydrate, your body “keto-adapts”, and you cease to be frequently hungry (which now seems like a distant, and alien memory).

Unless the meals I were eating were exceedingly small, I don’t even think I could eat more than 2 or 3 times per day, and I’m a known to eat a lot.

Even more than 2 times a day seems like a bit of a hassle (small snack of pemmican or cheese aside).

I wake up, eat a lot of heavy cream. Later in the day, I eat meat, or eggs. Case closed. In between I am only hungry if I skimped on the cream, even then, “hungry” is a unique term once a person is keto-adapted. It becomes more of a mental itch than physical pain (as is common on a “high carbohydrate diet”, which is sort of an oxymoron now that I think about it).

Cooking, any tips? What about “raw food” and the “raw food movement”?

Yes, don’t under cook your food, and don’t overcook it (unless you are intentionally going to eat something raw, such as fish or egg yolks), simply cook it to your taste preference (it doesn’t matter once it’s safe to eat and as long as it’s not burnt to hell).

Egg yolks are the one exception I know of. As far as I can tell, they are best eaten raw, or close to it. Egg whites must always be cooked however.

Meats can be eaten raw (fish is common), but it’s not entirely safe. At least sear the outside.

Dairy may also be best raw, although I’m doubting it. “Raw” simply doesn’t mean much once the food gets nuked by your stomach acid. Avoid ultra-pasteurized dairy products if possible though – that’s additional “nuking” before your stomach gets to it. No thank you.

So what about the “raw food movement” you ask?

Well, for starters, I have friends that are passionate supporters of it.

Sympathy for their feelings aside, my personal, humble opinion?

It’s only trumped in the “nonsense and self serving propaganda arena” by the idea that humans are naturally vegetarians.

The “raw food movement” is as completely and utterly false as it can get. If Kenneth Cooper’s “aerobics” became the modern faux cardio movement, hippy veganism (that kills more animals than it saves) became the raw food movement.

Same shit, new packaging to serve a hidden moral agenda (that perpetuates exactly what it set out to “solve”).

Humans literally evolved, due to cooking. You can’t even live in the wild, without cooking. It is physically impossible, to get enough calories, from raw food (as a human), without modern food processing and agriculture.

The amount of calories available from raw plant food, and even animal food (egg yolks aside), in the wild, is nothing short of laughable. Man quickly starves in the wild without cooking.

To assume that this food, that would kill you without modern technology, is somehow better for you? Ridiculous to a level that defies description.

It sounds nice on paper of course, “eat live foods if you want to feel alive!”. (Tony Robbins has actually used such logic in his older nutritional seminars). But it is utterly false, dangerously romanticizes our past, and completely disregards how our entire digestive system works.

I actually worry for one of my raw-foodist friends. Not him directly though – he’ll probably wise up before any serious damage is done – but for his new wife, and unborn child (should they end up having children, which I believe they are).

It is a dietary choice that is dangerously low in calories (even with modern food processing), and even lower in essential nutrients – unless you can somehow gorge on raw meat without getting sick (even then, it’s a poor idea).

To grow a child in a mother’s womb, on this type of dietary plan? Scary to even think about, not to mention having the child grow up on such a diet.

Anyway, if you’re interested in learning more about cooked and raw food, there is no better book than Catching Fire: How Cooking Made us Human, which actually delves into more than the chemistry component of cooking and it’s effects on human evolution.

It’s also a lot less abrasive than I am, so don’t let my arrogance about the subject make you shun the book if you currently eat mostly or all raw foods =).

How does nutrition factor in with current “health care reform” in the US?

It causes any and all “debate” for it, to be 100% void and invalid.

Why?

The reason is simple – over 75% of our current costs in “health care”, are a direct result of our dietary choices. We know these costs as the “disease of civilization“.

Let’s repeat that statement so it is abundantly clear. The majority of current costs for “health care”, are the direct result of individual dietary choices (and other conventional wisdom). In other words, individuals are at fault. Knowingly or unaware is irrelevant, since I refuse to pay for another individuals poor choices that were well within his or her’s control.

Carr accident? A broken leg from playing a sport? Random event that no one could have anticipated?

Sure, it’s probably not a bad idea to attempt to come together as a society and make these kind of unforseen events less of an issue (possibly, but not necessarily through government).

Force people who have thought for themselves and worked hard for what wealth they have produced, to pay, for someone elses **ck up that is 100% their fault?

That’s outright insane. There is no argument for health care reform – it ends with the fact that currently some 3/4 of our health care costs are the direct result of poor dietary choices. If this was not so, then there would legitimate discussion.

At the moment, this is a bunch of scum bags trying to steal from the minority and slapping a bunch of propaganda on it to get support from the masses.

I for one, will have nothing to do with directly paying for someone elses mistakes, no matter the cost.

What about pets, what should they be eating?

It depends on the animal. A hamster should not be eating the same food as your dog for example … Never the less, dogs and cats (which I assume this type of question would be about), are 100% carnivorous. You could say we are as well, except we can tolerate being omnivorous to the extent that it is required to survive.

Regardless, your dog/cat should be eating nothing but meat. It’s ludicrous to think otherwise, and anyone telling you differently, is either trying to sell you something, or grossly misinformed.

If you feed them common dog and cat “food”, they will inevitably become sick (and fat), because it’s not meat and probably contains tons of corn and soy. I’ve watched my families dog/cats become sick, and my room mates cat as well (bladder infections). These events are costly, and annoying when they pee blood on your sheets.

Do your pet, and yourself a favor, and feed them cheap meat.

Read more about cats here and dogs here.

You’ve done a lot of crazy and wild stuff Anthony, are you sure this isn’t another fad diet?

I’ve been through a lot of different “diets” over the years, and this is perhaps the most valid skepticism if there ever was one. However, I encourage people to view this in a positive instead of negative light.

I’ve basically gone through all of the bull $#!+, so you don’t have to. Any area of importance has this same path to mastery, whether it be success with women, exercise, career, and so on. Nutrition is no exception, unless you happen to stumble onto something valid early on, by random chance.

I certainly did not. I got sucked into a lot of nonsense by well intentioned individuals. I hold no grudges, but wish it upon no one. Do your own research and see if you come to my conclusions, but save yourself a lot of time by not having to try out everything under the sun, and move on to your next topic of interest.

In addition to all of this, my path with nutrition followed has had a “paleo” theme for some time, which is certainly in the right direction, and a major source of reason for much of what was written in this post.

My dietary choices basically went as follows.

  • Standard American Diet (SAD)
  • Vegetarian
  • Vegan
  • Tinkered with Alkaline/Raw Veganism
  • Paleo Vegan (no more grains and beans)
  • Paleo/Octo Vegetarian (vegan plus eggs and fish)
  • Mostly paleo vegetarian with eggs, some grass fed meat
  • More eggs, slightly more meat, slightly less plants
  • Lots of eggs, some meat, even less plants
  • Mostly eggs, meat, nuts, little plants
  • Mostly eggs, meat, dairy (continuing on the less plants theme)
  • Mostly meat, some eggs, and dairy fat (very little plants)

Which is where I’m at now. Most days of the week, I eat no plants (excluding coffee). I just eat heavy cream, and meat. Sometimes cheese, sometimes eggs (eggs are awesome for the record).

I feel I was pretty fortunate to have turned out where I did though. A lot of people, many friends included, get sucked into one dogma, and stop their search for truth.

I’ve never experienced the success I have with the way I have chosen to eat for the past few months. I constantly feel good, never bloated, never gassy, plenty of energy, skin is healthy, hair is healthy, teeth are healthy, I’m lean, and stronger than I have ever been, by a long shot.

There is definitely more to be learned, but really, continuing on the trend outlined above, how many options are there?

Of the options available (say, eliminating dairy completely), how much of an option is that, really? Eliminating a source of animal fat and replacing it with another?

Wow, what a fundamental shift in diet! =)

Anyway, as far as I can tell, I’ve hit the sweet spot. I’m always open to new ideas, and ideas that contradict those presented today … but then again, I can’t recall ever reading something that seemed even remotely legitimate as a counter argument to any of the major themes in this article.

I’ve believed otherwise at times of course, but after years gone by, and from a birds eye view, nope.

Have questions, comments, or concerns? I’m an open book. Let’s boogy.

About Anthony Dream Johnson

CEO, founder, and architect of The 21 Convention, Anthony Dream Johnson is the leading force behind the world's first and only "panorama event for life on earth". He has been featured on WGN Chicago, and in the NY Times #1 best seller The Four Hour Work Week.    His stated purpose for the work he does is "the actualization of the ideal man", a purpose that has led him to found and host The 21 Convention across 3 continents and for 6 years in a row. Anthony blogs vigorously at TheDreamLounge.net and Declarationism.com.

98 Responses to The Quest for Nutritional Truth: Why I Eat the Way I Eat

  1. Hammer January 5, 2010 at 4:15 pm #

    Good post man. That story about your friend eating sugar as his cancer re-emerged reminded me of something I read in Good Calories, Bad Calories, which Tim Ferriss calls the definitive work on nutrition. It was a study on semi-starvation in rats as a treatment for cancer. Basically when you starve rats that have cancer, the cancer cells essentially stop dividing, and these rats end up living full length lives. It makes me wonder how much of the effectiveness of chemotherapy medication is related to the nausea and resulting caloric restriction./weight loss as opposed to the actual medication’s effect on the cells.

    In addition to the disease causing effects of carbohydrates, I think a key element of the “poison” effect that you didn’t address here and may or may not be aware of is the nutritional deficiency that carbohydrates cause. It’s like negative nutrition in a lot of ways, offsetting the good stuff. I don’t think this is especially well understood, but it is well documented experimentally that for example, carbohydrates cause vitamin deficiencies including calcium and vitamin c among many others. It is also well documented that people can be completely content eating 800 calories a day of meat and protein, whereas if you add another 400 calories of fruit and vegetables they become massively starved and experience all of the symptoms of starvation.

    Your choice of words on healthcare is pretty harsh and difficult to believe given your friend’s history. The fact is that medical care is outrageously expensive, even with VERY good insurance. Without good information out there, people really aren’t responsible for their diseases of civilization. I myself had some very serious medical problems that I survived, and while this could have been prevented with proper nutrition growing up, neither I nor my parents had any idea that anything was wrong with my nutrition and no one told me otherwise. Your friend’s situation sounds similar. It’s hard to place blame in this situation. That said, I have corrected for this going forward, and everyone who I care about now at least knows what they’re supposed to be doing, and any resulting disease is now their fault if they don’t correct.

    Anyway, we’ll definitely have to talk more in July at the 21 convention. I have my ticket purchased and my airfare booked.

  2. Dream January 5, 2010 at 5:08 pm #

    @Hammer

    ” I think a key element of the “poison” effect that you didn’t address here and may or may not be aware of is the nutritional deficiency that carbohydrates cause.”

    I was actually hoping people would come across Danny Roddy’s post about this topic on their own, since the article was approaching 8,000 words and I knew I had to stop somewhere =). Thank you for brining it up however, it is an important point.

    “Your choice of words on healthcare is pretty harsh and difficult to believe given your friend’s history.”

    It was pretty harsh, and not perfectly worded. I may do an additional post at some point about health care in light of this.

    Regarding my friend, he had health insurance. The company provided over $300,000 dollars in treatment, and he died. I’m not even convinced they help him live longer, let alone did anything positive (other than cut the giant tumor out of his leg).

    “The fact is that medical care is outrageously expensive, even with VERY good insurance.”

    It is insanely expensive, and I’m not claiming the current system is fine and dandy, but we have to ask, why is it expensive, what is the source of the problem?

    “Without good information out there, people really aren’t responsible for their diseases of civilization.”

    Finding good information is a crap shoot, but yes, it is out there. Should a person not happen to come across it (assuming they are even looking in the first place), it is not MY responsibility or YOURS to help that person.

    Can we take upon ourselves to do so by our own free will? Certainly. Should we FORCE everyone to do so? Apparently some people in this country think we should, and that the government has the right and power to do so (it doesn’t, and was never meant to).

    Look forward to meetin you in July man, thanks for commenting.

    -Anthony

  3. Simon January 5, 2010 at 5:37 pm #

    For such a long post, I’d expect myself to want to write a long response. But I really don’t have much to say or question since what you wrote is just about word for word my views (and I too have done much reading and research on this topic). I’m going to try to get some of my friends to read this post.

    And ditto on the looking forward to the convention.

    simz

    • Dream January 6, 2010 at 5:53 pm #

      @Simon

      “I’m going to try to get some of my friends to read this post.”

      Thanks man, I appreciate the word of mouth. It is by far the best way to help out.

  4. Will January 5, 2010 at 6:32 pm #

    You’re a man wise way beyond his years. You don’t know how lucky you are to have found these things out at a young age. I sure as hell wish I would have learned about proper diet and exercise when I was your age, as an achy hip from all that “healthy” aerobic activity (I’m one of those runner “drop-outs” who would not have been included in the arthritis study) now attests.

    Good work!

    W

    • Dream January 6, 2010 at 5:48 pm #

      @Will

      Thank you for the kind words. Just hope I can find enough wisdom to have a major impact on my generation.

  5. Matt January 5, 2010 at 8:38 pm #

    Awesome post–I have been anticipating this one for a while.

    But I do have one question: What about the vitamins in plants? Do you take supplements? I read “The Primal Blueprint”, as a result of your glowing endorsement of it, and Sisson’s suggested diet is full of plants.

    Thanks.

  6. Hammer January 5, 2010 at 10:50 pm #

    The doctor’s may not have helped him live longer, but they certainly helped me live longer. The prognosis for my disease was 80% dead after 5 years, and even after the disease went away for the most part there was some permanent damage from it that was remedied by MAJOR surgery in year six, without which I would most certainly be dead by now. Even with very good health insurance, including 80% out of pocket reimbursement, my parents still spent well over $200,000 on copays, deductibles and other out of pocket expenses not covered by insurance. In fact, it was a very good thing that I got better when I did, because another 8 months (had I lived that long) and I would have no longer been covered under his insurance and would have been in no condition to work. Fortunately, my parents were able to dip into savings and afford this, but what about those who aren’t so lucky?

    Why would someone who’s slim, athletic and generally healthy by every measurement research nutrition? You researched it because, among other things, your friend died. I pretty much just stumbled across it because I’m a big Tim Ferriss fan, although I wouldn’t have even heard of the guy unless I happened to be in the entrepreneurship class that he speaks to twice a year (mentioned in TFHWW) at the university that he graduated from. I may have eventually found it through the PUA community and your talks at last year’s 21 convention, but had I not already been primed by Tim’s posts, would I have given it a second thought? Probably not.

    As long as the government is perpetuating this misinformation it really should be the government’s responsibility to pay for health insurance, and of course we pay for the government. Voting with your dollars is certainly a great idea, but I think that we also need some massive nutrition policy overhaul before we can start blaming people for being uninformed. That’s like blaming people for being obese due to lack of will power, which Taubes pretty much destroys in GCBC. Until we do overhaul the government’s position on nutrition, there should be government mechanisms in place to treat that which is being prescribed.

    • Dream January 6, 2010 at 6:43 pm #

      @Hammer

      “Fortunately, my parents were able to dip into savings and afford this, but what about those who aren’t so lucky?”

      >>>I think a better question to ask would be “what can we do to make *luck* less of a factor, regarding costly and expensive medical treatment/care?”. I think a solution we can all agree on is to figure out how to lower the cost of that care/treatment, by figuring out the root of the problem and going from there. What the government is currently trying to push through is an attempt to “give” everyone a “right”, to someone elses services, which of course, doesn’t exist. I have no right to force you to perform a service for me, and you have no right to force a service of me. The government itself doesn’t even have the ability to “give” rights in the first place, it’s job is to protect what already exists.

      >>>On the same note, there will always be people who are unfortunate, and do not have the funds to afford treatment (that previously did not exist) for serious diseases, that are not of an immediate/emergency nature (such as trauma related injuries). The more we try to forcefully eliminate such a thing, the closer to hell we get. The same applies for any sort of “utopia” creation, including the elimination of unemployment (having a “right” to a job), and the US acting as a world police. The government simply wasn’t created to perform such functions. Can people come together and attempt to alleviate such conditions/problems? Yes, but that is not the same thing as forcing everyone to our will at the present moment.

      >>>In the case of health care, yes something should be done. It’s nuts to hear how much money your parents had to spend, and my friends insurance company had to drop (similar to your amount) on “treatment”. But again, we have to find the root of the problem, rather than forcefully slap band aids on the symptoms (bloated costs).

      “Why would someone who’s slim, athletic and generally healthy by every measurement research nutrition? You researched it because, among other things, your friend died.”

      >>>Why wouldn’t they? In my case, I became interested in it by listening to an audio program by Anthony Robbins about largely unrelated topics (although they were linked in the sense that both nutrition and the topics I was hearing about, centered around bettering myself). I think it’s folly to assume people can’t be pro-active and take up interest in this field before problems arise. My interest was only further increased once my friend died some 2 years after beginning to read about food/eating/nutrition.

      “I pretty much just stumbled across it because I’m a big Tim Ferriss fan, although I wouldn’t have even heard of the guy unless I happened to be in the entrepreneurship class that he speaks to twice a year (mentioned in TFHWW) at the university that he graduated from. I may have eventually found it through the PUA community and your talks at last year’s 21 convention, but had I not already been primed by Tim’s posts, would I have given it a second thought? Probably not.”

      >>>I think so actually. I assume you listened to Tim Ferriss’s speech because on some level, you were interested in “bettering yourself” (or however one chooses to word it). Had you not been, how unlikely is it that you would have ignored Tim’s speech? The same applies to the pickup community- I assume on some level, you wanted better success with women, and therefore, in life. There is nothing wrong with this of course. Something doesn’t sit quite right with us, and we look to improve our prospects. Who’s to say many people will not end up venturing into other fields once they connect the dots that you CAN design and improve your life as one sees fit? Nutrition is certainly a topic in the spot light in the US as well, considering our soaring rate of obesity and other diseases.

      “As long as the government is perpetuating this misinformation it really should be the government’s responsibility to pay for health insurance, and of course we pay for the government.”

      >>>But who decides what information the government puts out? Who is the government comprised of? The answer to both of those questions is, us, the people. The subsidizing of agriculture is not in the best interest of the people, or the US government- it is in the best interest of various corporations, and the individuals running them (not to mention the various corrupt individuals currently in power, that we freely elected, supporting specific corporations for their own personal gain). We let these things pass by continuing to pay for the non sense they produce. By buying variations of corn, soy, wheat, and buying the animals that are fed these things. The alternatives are there, I’m sure you’re aware of this, we just have to take action, not only with our money, but with our mouths too. When the masses become educated, government (and even corporations) will be forced to change, or face serious (and perhaps even violent) consequences.

      >>>The underlying theme here is that the power and responsibility resides in individuals, both in corrupt/elitist thinking morons (in government and corporations alike), and the average person just trying to live their life without others stealing from them and forcing them to do things they have no interest in doing (things other individuals decide are “good for them” but are really only in the interest of a few other individuals).

      >>>The blame goes on neither the “guuberment” or “evil and greedy corporations”, both are simply concepts, and ultimately have no power except that granted by the people (through voting or purchases). When these people are largely uneducated, bad things happen. When they are educated…well we’ll have to wait and see. I think discussion like this is exactly that though- education, on both ends.

      “Until we do overhaul the government’s position on nutrition, there should be government mechanisms in place to treat that which is being prescribed.”

      >>>That seems ideal, but in reality is a slippery slope, and the equivalent of treating the symptom and ignoring a larger problem. Think about it, can we really expect a government mechanism to be set in place when their advice is idiotic and downright harmful, to suddenly disapear once they finally realize how ignorant their advice is? By creating a government “mechanism” to solve a problem within the government in the first place (that we as a people allowed), we’re only perpetuating the problem. How can the institution be expected to change, if we only further support their nonsense? I for one can’t imagine the government going “We have been granted all this power, to fix a problem that we were allowed to create. We now see our past mistakes, will completely overhaul our stance on nutrition, and will give up all of this power granted to alleviate the problem we were once a major part of, that people have come to rely and depend on.”

      If we allow it to happen, people will only become dependent on it, and it will be ever harder to reverse for the better.

  7. Bartlomiej January 6, 2010 at 6:11 am #

    Hey Anthony!
    I’m beginning to like your posts more and more.
    You have this confident-offensive writing-style, which I think is really required right now to wake up people from this epidemic coma of unconsciousness they are kept in by popular beliefs.

    I once read somewhere, that our planet can feed 15 billion people (if I recall it correctly), that being of agriculture of course, and if the population rises beyond that we will need to look for nutritional alternatives. Though I believe that a world with 15 billion people living in it is a really dark view of the future, I think we are allready past the point where we should have started looking for those alternatives globally.
    My question is: do you know of any scientific estimation how many people could survive if we went back to eating mostly animals that are fed naturally, not with corn, and raised in a healthy environment which again requires space, so there is no possibility that this resource is infinite.

    I am a huge fan of human and scientific progress.
    There is a lot to learn about nature and the universe and If you think of it there are only few people who push progress ahead while others have to concentrate on feeding and entertaining the masses so that the economy that feeds and entertains the masses doesn’t collapse.
    If think we could really live up to our potential much faster if we would consequently disregard our genetic nature and create an environment that’s toxic to our health.

    What are your thoughts on that?
    And if you answer these questions in another post then please just point me in that direction, I didn’t go through all your posts yet.

    All the best,

    B.

  8. Harry Ha January 6, 2010 at 12:19 pm #

    Not all carbohydrates are same. There are poisonous carbohydrate and good carbohydrate. white flour, white sugar, white something are all poisonous whereas whole grain brown flour, brown rice, brown somethings are all good carbohydrate. Body uses carbohydrate for energy but it requires minerals and vitamins that come with germs and bran in whole grains. White flour without them creates problem in using the nutrient for physiological function. Consuming foods of white something of grains will develop diseases of all kinds. For energy, body does not use protein for energy if there is carbohydrate available because using protein for energy make body acidic that give good environment for cancer cell development. Protein is so precious commodity that it is recycled as much as cells can utilize. So eating too much protein from meat and eggs is not a good thing for your health. Meat, dairy and egg industry will dispute and hide and distort the true scientific fact about what is good for your healthy body. In the industrialized capitalist countries where business comes first, money talks so loud it drowns out all the good voices. It is just like oil industry trying to debunk climate change. I hope you are not a victim of that industry conspiracy.

  9. Jeffrey January 6, 2010 at 12:21 pm #

    Thanks a lot for this post.

    My diet is far from perfect, but I eat pretty much no vegetables just by pure taste. My friends always chide me and make fun of me for not eating vegetables telling me that I need to take vitamins to supplement my diet. I’ve tried vitamins, but just end up with expensive, nuclear yellow pee. I now believe that vitamins should only be used if a doctor diagnoses a deficiency. Otherwise, they are unnecessary. I took cholesterol and blood tests a couple years ago (I’m 29), and my levels were exemplary. My friends and family were dumbfounded. I naturally gravitate towards the diet you recommend.

    I do, however, have a question out of ignorance. You describe everything in detail, except one thing. What the hell is ‘heavy cream’ and why should I be eating this?

    Thanks again.

  10. Jeffrey January 6, 2010 at 12:38 pm #

    One more thing. I want a good answer to my friends who always tell me that I’m missing out on these magic ingredients that vegetables supply and that I should at least take a supplement. I would like to begin with ‘That’s bullshit because…”

  11. Dream January 6, 2010 at 2:34 pm #

    I’m sorry, hardly a comment, but man this had me cracking up.

    “My friends always chide me and make fun of me for not eating vegetables telling me that I need to take vitamins to supplement my diet. I’ve tried vitamins, but just end up with expensive, nuclear yellow pee.”

    Quote of the day! lol

  12. Dream January 6, 2010 at 2:49 pm #

    @Matt

    Awesome post–I have been anticipating this one for a while.

    >>>Thanks man. Apologies on the wait time though (been trying to write this for months now, and promising it finished all to often). Please bitch at me if I ever do such a thing with an important post again!, but still have patience =).

    But I do have one question: What about the vitamins in plants? Do you take supplements?

    >>>I take some cod oil, on occasion. This “sort of” balances out eating too many omega 6 fatty acids, such as when I’m not in Orlando for an extended period of time. I don’t think they have any magical properties though, just help alleviate eating lower quality meat (mildly). Probably useful on the run as well if you travel a lot. I may consider taking Vitamin D supps at some point as well, such as when I travel to Sweden this summer for a good amount of time. I’ll discuss “vitamins in plants” more in other comments on this post as it seems to be a recurring question/topic of interest.

    I read “The Primal Blueprint”, as a result of your glowing endorsement of it, and Sisson’s suggested diet is full of plants.

    >>>>That it is (and meat as well). However, I do not endorse The Primal Blueprint for the specific dietary recomendations (and if you look closely at the review, I do knock Mark on suggesting too many fruits and veggies, among other recommendations in the book).

    >>>>I highly recommend TPB however, because it is, as far as I know, the best print book available on “paleo” eating, and it serves as an excellent introduction to MAJOR points of interest, including the dramatic reduction or elimination of grains from the diet, myths about saturated fat, and generally looking to our past for nutritional help without incorporating modern myths like Leon Cordain did in “The Paleo Diet”- it depends what you consider “myths”, but in any case, a lot less than Cordain did.

    >>>You simply don’t see many (if any?) other print books take such stances, and people tend to listen more closely to what is in print, versus random blog posts (even if the blogs are far better, such is the case with Dr. Michael Eades). I for one, love reading books in print, instead of online.

    >>>Anyway, don’t throw the baby out with the bath water! 😉 TPB may not be perfect, but I still recommend people that are new read it, and share it with friends. Mark is also a lot less abrasive than myself, and some people simply respond to that style of writing better. The book also covers a few other “lifestyle” suggestions that many people would benefit from, including a short discussion on “happy feet” (going barefoot over shod).

  13. Dream January 6, 2010 at 2:59 pm #

    @Jeffrey

    “I do, however, have a question out of ignorance. You describe everything in detail, except one thing. What the hell is ‘heavy cream’ and why should I be eating this?”

    LOL, man I didn’t even think to define it. Heavy Cream is basically milk fat, before it is turned to butter. Good sources from grass fed cows that are only “regular” pasteurized, do not taste like butter very much though. It tastes quite good actually.

    It is heavily saturated (a good thing), and goes great in coffee! It has nothing in it, other than fat, and a few vitamins.

    Perhaps you are familiar with “half and half”? That’s half heavy cream, half milk.

  14. Max O January 7, 2010 at 12:47 am #

    Wow! Just finished reading half your post along with the Q&A and I’m surprised. Its like you did an entire 360 degrees since we use to be roommates in Orlando. Either way, really good read. I plan on finishing it later this week. Keep doing what you do man.

  15. mikeG January 7, 2010 at 4:06 am #

    Ok Dream
    You got me on this diet now for a while, since I saw ur U21C vid on it I have bin eating 12-15 eggs a day. Should I be eating only the omega 3 eggs or is any average chicken egg good? I was concerned about the fiber/bathroom stuff- I noticed I dont go nearly as often. If I die from a massive heart attack from this high egg/meat diet Im gunna be pissed hahah

    Thnx

  16. Dream January 7, 2010 at 12:53 pm #

    @MikeG

    Hey dude, I’ve been downing a PINT of heavy cream a day for a while now…if anyone’s gonna die first, it’s me! haha

    No seriously, anyone telling you egg yolks are going to give you a heart attack, doesn’t know what they’re talking about. I used to eat that many eggs a day as well, and still do on occasion if I am out of meat for the day. Hot sauce goes especially well on them =).

    “Omega 3 enriched” eggs are usually a bit better. Not truly “free range”, but they are exposed to the outdoors more, and are fed mostly flax seed (much better than corn or soy). These are the type of eggs I buy actually.

  17. Greg January 7, 2010 at 2:19 pm #

    I agree with some of what you say, but let me play devil’s advocate for a minute. You compare destructive monoculture to sustainable animal farming. That’s as valid as comparing sustainable polyculture with destructive factory farming. Of course “sustainable” is better than “destructive”. Sustainable agriculture and sustainable animal farming are both preferable to monoculture and factory farming. The question I guess you’d be raising if you were being fair is, which is better for health and environment and which is more efficient/productive if we had to choose one. Obvious where you stand. Of course, it’s a farce to state unequivocally either way. You can’t know. And why choose? We ARE omnivores, whether you current belief system lets you acknowledge it or not. As much as your brain tells you my body doesn’t know what it wants/needs, I can tell you my body is far more intelligent than your brain when it comes to knowing what it wants/needs. Now, it takes some attention at first to understand that craving chips may not mean that you’re chip-deficient, but probably calorically deficient, but once you hone into your body’s signals, it’s a fairly simple matter. I don’t care how emphatically you declare me a fool. Truth is not identified by loudness. If I were to eat nothing but grass-fed meat, eggs and heavy cream for the next year and determined that I feel crappy, would that mean I am a defective human? If I tell you I feel better eating mostly plants, does that mean I am unwittingly deceiving myself and I should still go forward with eating mostly meat b/c I should believe what you tell me more than what my body tells me? Clearly, your implication here is that all humans are designed to thrive on the same diet. And this is because pritive man ate such diet (allegedly). (As a side note, I find it fascinating that the Paleo diet followers have so much first hand knowledge of the daily [and even gastrointestinal] lives of our caveman forefathers, as well as the precise foods [and specific strains thereof] that were available and regularly consumed. Look out anthropology; internet dietary chatter has supplanted you.) One question I would ask is, will man ever evolve to a condition that allows him to thrive on other foods? Or, is this our permanent condition? If it is permanent, then why do we use the term “evolve” and “evolution” with respect to man’s journey as a species? To evolve is to undergo change and development. I’m sure you can concede man has undergone certain changes. Why can diet not be one of them? Not enough time has transpired since the dawn of agriculture? Ok, when will we know enough time has transpired? My guess is your answer will be never, b/c the all meat diet will always be optimal and typical modern man is wrong in almost every facet. But that doesn’t jive with evolutionary history. Man has changed and will continue to change. That is evolution. A process of change to adapt, survive and, ultimately, thrive. Adapatations require change and change requires being different than before. Call me a torchbearer for the mankind of tomorrow.
    Now, all that said, I am open to trying new approaches to diet and exercise and will report back my results with the “Dream” diet.

    Thanks,
    Greg

    • Dream January 7, 2010 at 5:36 pm #

      “You compare destructive monoculture to sustainable animal farming. That’s as valid as comparing sustainable polyculture with destructive factory farming”

      >>>It would appear so, but not necessarily. Raising animals for the purpose of “food” on pasture that would have been there in the first place is a lot closer to what would have been going on anyway, unlike any form of large scale agriculture, “sustainable” and poly-crop alike, in which case the original environment is largely removed and replaced with what we deem fit.

      “And why choose? We ARE omnivores, whether you current belief system lets you acknowledge it or not.”

      >>>This argument is a slippery slope. I agree, we are omnivorous, but the reality is only when necessary. IOW, we can tolerate being “omnivores” to the extent that it is required to survive. This is a great adaptation, one I surely don’t condemn, and one that has probably helped us become the dominant species on the planet. So I do acknowledge it, even agree, but I also acknowledge that there is no need to eat a single plant our entire lives, no matter your ethnicity or genetic heritage (where differences do exist).

      “As much as your brain tells you my body doesn’t know what it wants/needs, I can tell you my body is far more intelligent than your brain when it comes to knowing what it wants/needs. Now, it takes some attention at first to understand that craving chips may not mean that you’re chip-deficient, but probably calorically deficient, but once you hone into your body’s signals, it’s a fairly simple matter.”

      >>>I agree, our bodies are infinitely more intelligent in determining what we should be eating, and it is a fairly “simple” matter. In fact it’s so simple we can use a process of elimination to figure out what needs to be eaten for survival, and what produces addicition and cravings. First, eliminate protein from the diet. What happens? You crave protein, your body demands it, there is no way around it. Eliminate fat from the diet, the body demands it, no way around it. You will become sick without both of these macro nutrients, no matter the circumstances. Now eliminate carbohydrate from the diet (aside from the tiny amorunt of carbohydrate found in meat/eggs). At first you crave carbohydrate, but go on relatively fine without it. After a few weeks, the body adapts, and carbohydrates are no longer craved. In fact, over time, most lose their taste for carbohydrate all together. Not only is there apparent “health”, and lack of craving for the nutrient, but your very ability to withstand anything more than small amounts of it, dwindles.

      >>>Consider all of this, and the fact that carbohydrate was the rarest macro nutrient for millions of years of our evolution. Do you not find this the least bit interesting? No deficiencies are produced on a diet without carbohydrate. There is no craving for it, and at that point, anything more than small amounts causes one to feel or be ill to various degrees.

      “If I were to eat nothing but grass-fed meat, eggs and heavy cream for the next year and determined that I feel crappy, would that mean I am a defective human?”

      >>>I think you’re leaping without looking first here. In addition, that wouldn’t imply the dietary choices are at fault for the person feeling “crappy”. What if that person had other bodily defects present beforehand?

      ” If I tell you I feel better eating mostly plants, does that mean I am unwittingly deceiving myself and I should still go forward with eating mostly meat b/c I should believe what you tell me more than what my body tells me?”

      >>>>To an extent, yes it would. Eating a substantial amount of “plants” will prevent the body from “keto-adapting”. This is a major piece of the puzzle that takes time, a few weeks for most, that de-validates “not feeling good” when plants/carbohydrate is removed from the diet. Indeed, many people become “cranky” without carbohydrate in their diet at first, as is true with withdrawal from most (all?) addictions.

      >>>I do not believe you should do “what I tell you”. I simply provide my personal research and experience, for free, on this blog. Take it or leave it, I force it upon no one. As it turns out however, yes, this is how humans are meant to eat. We can live off a lot of different substances, but thrive off of animals.

      ” And this is because pritive man ate such diet (allegedly)”

      >>>It’s not that simple actually. Humans have eaten quite a variety of foods over the millions of years of evolution. Eating strictly those foods (and any of those foods) is labeled “paleo” eating, and is supposedly “healthy”. Ancient man ate a lot of things that weren’t too fantastic for us though, they were simply eaten to survive. Starchy tubers and honey come to mind, as well as modern versions of fruits and vegetables that were once largely unpalatable (and were far less sweet). The underlying theme of this post, and a few other bloggers (in particular Kurt Hariss) is to identify which foods are best from the pool we once ate from, by filtering that pool through our modern understanding of metabolism, how nutrients are used, which ones are actually necessary in the first place, and how how translate all of this into modern dietary choices. The result? Eat animals, and animal products from the highest quality sources available to us, and little if anything else. Don’t under cook them, don’t overcook them. When frying, used heavily saturated fats.

      “One question I would ask is, will man ever evolve to a condition that allows him to thrive on other foods? Or, is this our permanent condition? If it is permanent, then why do we use the term “evolve” and “evolution” with respect to man’s journey as a species?”

      >>>Evolution can occur at rates faster than most would imagine, but, it does have its limits. Some people can tolerate lactose from milk after childhood for example, and others can tolerate high and frequent spikes in insulin without much an immediate effect. Notice the word “tolerate” though. Most of us don’t tolerate grain/beans well, especially wheat. A prime reason for this, and why we haven’t “adapted” to eating these neolithic foods yet is that they are so diametrically opposed to what we evolved eating. Carbohydrate was the rarest macro nutrient, on a grand scale, for millions of years. These foods are PACKED with them. To expect the body to suddenly adapt to these foods? Simply impossible, they are just too different, lack the building blocks required to survive, and are PACKED with poison, originally meant to deter us from eating them in the first place (this is how certain plants defend themselves).

  18. Bret January 7, 2010 at 11:43 pm #

    Hey interesting post Anthony. First what’s the best source for info on eating this way? Also how do u afford to eat so much meat? And I currently drink alot of 1% milk. Would I be better off drinking whole milk?

  19. Chris - ZTF January 8, 2010 at 4:03 am #

    I agree with this diet to some extent in that it is probably not far from optimal and will keep you lean strong and healthy. The only caveat I see is humans natural want/need for texture, taste and variety. I enjoy cooking too much to eat a diet like you have suggested and while I base my diet heavily on animal foods I enjoy a large salad or grilled vegetables with herbs as well as my berries and nuts or a bowl of warming *Paleo* chilli. Although this may not be necessary it is refreshing and can make meal times more of an event plus the lure of potential anti-oxidants and minerals is tempting…..

    Great post BTW I admire the time and effort taken to write it and look forward to your future posts on the health/fitness topic.

    • Dream January 13, 2010 at 1:53 am #

      @Chris-ZTF

      I support what Nicky said in response to your comment. Thank you for the kind words and taking the time to comment.

      @Bret

      I buy my coconut oil at whole foods. It’s 6.99 plus tax for a 14 oz jar. It’s a great quality, at a low cost. As far as I know, as cheap or cheaper than anything on the net.

      As for energy during various levels of physical activity and “exercise” (two different concepts), it uses the same sources- fat, and carbohydrate. In the case of very low or “zero” carbohydrate intake, the body is better suited to burn fat however. This is ideal for all forms of physical endeavor, especially endurance events where “carbohydrate overloading” and other non-sense is the norm.

      As for the carbohydrate being used for physical activity (that you aren’t eating much of, if any at all), the body produces all that is required as Nicky discussed here

      http://www.thedreamlounge.net/2010/01/08/2010-greater-orlando-fitness-challenge-w-drew-baye-patrick-diver/comment-page-1/#4223

      Your muscles and liver have quite a large store of carbohydrate as well (which your body replenishes, see above link).

  20. Bret January 8, 2010 at 4:20 am #

    Ok thanks Anthony. When you eat low carb what does your body use for an energy source during anaerobic exercise? Also wondering where to buy coconut oil. I checked my local grocery store and couldn’t find any.

  21. Jordan S January 8, 2010 at 3:39 pm #

    Anthony

    I think the easiest (and probably most dangerous) way to prove what kind of food humans are supposed to eat is to eat individual food groups for months on end. If we are truly omnivores, this way of eating should be a cake walk. Its not. Anyone who tries this is eventually going to become sick. Unless they are eating soley meat. I was one who did use this method. After eating nothing but seeds, veggies, and grain for only 6 months, I was ravaged by colds and flu, lost about 25lbs, was tired, cranky, unable to complete my workouts, lost interest in sex (that was a hurter) and at the same time was “thin” and tried to justify my diet that way. Afteer deciding to choose to be soley carnivorous, I gained back 15lbs, my sex drive, stamina and power for exercise, and I haven’t had even a sniffle for a year. I have recently (on your suggestion) started using heavy cream and its fantastic. great blog too. Will be inviting many others to read.

  22. Nicky January 8, 2010 at 8:12 pm #

    Wow. That was a monstrous post that brings together a lot of what you’ve been writing about on TDL and helps us understand how you got here. Congratulations on writing it and posting it.

    I know how hard it is because I’ve been trying to do the same with my experiences in nutrition/exercise the past few years; trying to write it has basically brought my budding blog to a halt. When you are that deep in something, it’s easy to get stuck trying to find the perfect words.

    I am amazed at how similar our paths have been. As far as diet is concerned, nearly identical! I really appreciate the year a spent without meat though because it showed me what I was willing to sacrifice to find the truth.

    If I had one suggestion it would be to more clearly assert that from the beginning. You write strongly which is probably an asset for you, but I think for many others, framing the article with your open-mindedness from the start might allow them to digest more of it.

    Seriously, though, great article and it leaves a lot of open doors for you to go down with future articles which is great. Thanks for the motivation to get back to writing myself!

    @Bartlomiej

    I have read a lot of different things in a lot of different places about what size population the Earth could support if we ate this or that diet. What I take from that is that we just don’t know for sure.

    That being said, from what I can tell, it is just not realistic to feed 15 billion people given present variables. The issue is one of depletable resources, namely arable land/topsoil.

    Dirt is essentially a mixture of clay, sand and similar inorganic material. *Topsoil* on the other hand is practically a life-form in its own right, at the very least a habitat, full of bacteria, insects, nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and many other nutrients.

    There was a time when topsoil could be measured in feet. These days, inches at the very best. Fixing nitrogen from petroleum to produce synthetic fertilizer is a critical part of agriculture today specifically because we are coming to the end of our supply of arable land.

    Whenever we get to either the end of topsoil or oil, that is the end of industrial agriculture. It is not sustainable.

    The reason that it isn’t is because it does not give back the nutrients that it takes. This, environmentally speaking, is what is so intriguing about pasture-raised animals. They function within the natural cycles that they evolved. They take from the grass, but give back to the soil through their manure. They actually create topsoil, which creates more grass, which their future generations eat. This is what sustainability truly is.

    Lierre Keith, author of the Vegetarian Myth, thinks that the Earth could realistically support about 500 million humans. Dire indeed (and that could be as wrong as 15bill). But, like any population on Earth, ours will grow and be culled by the limitations of our environment.

    @Harry Ha

    I think it is unfortunate that it is so common to confuse what ‘carbohydrate’ truly means.

    Flour is *not* a carbohydrate, it is a food that contains carbohydrates. The carbohydrates in white rice and brown rice are identical, despite the food being different.

    The difference between brown and white rice is that brown rice is a whole grain that contains the bran, germ and endosperm of the grain. White rice is refined to just the endosperm. True, the bran and the germ contain fiber and vitamins but the carbohydrate is exactly the same and has the exact same effect on the body.

    Some argue that the fiber allows the carbohydrates to be processed more slowly, so that insulin levels don’t spike. I wonder if those people would say that Oreos could be “Good Oreos” if eaten with a multi-vitamin and tablespoon of fiber.

    Health is not just about what you eat but what you don’t eat. Carbohydrates in excess are shown to be non-optimal for our bodies. More than happy to look at evidence that shows otherwise.

    @Jeffrey

    I know how you feel when it comes to dealing with friends. Eating is a very social thing and not blending in gets attention. I want to experiment for myself, but not look like a quack. I often catch my brain thinking about ways to respond to people that have questions about why I eat what I eat.

    Sometimes I have to remind myself that it really shouldn’t be about proving them wrong or myself right but merely that I have reasons for choosing what I am choosing and “here they are”. The nice thing is that this allows them to actually listen without getting defensive.

    So, here are my thoughts on vegetables:

    I don’t think they are that bad but the extent that we think they’ll save us doesn’t make sense to me. I have frequently heard “eat fruits and vegetables of at least 5 different colors every day to be healthy”

    If that much variation was needed in our diet for health, there is absolutely no way we could survive – it has only been around for 50-75 years at the most! Look at animals’ real diets. Cows get by on only grass, Panda bears on only eucalyptus, Tigers on only meat.

    We have this notion that since we are complex and have a variety of tissues and cells, we need to eat a variety of things. The animal kingdom shows us that this is a failing of our comprehension in how our bodies function. It shows us that you can eat primarily one thing and still produce skin, hair of different colors, eyes, organs, blood and so on.

    It may be that broccoli prevents cancer like CNN says it does. But I want some damn causation. How does it do that? Vegetables are so assumed to be healthy that no one backs up claims with physiological explanations.

    So, I eat vegetables when I feel like (I genuinely like onions, garlic, mushrooms, etc) and am open to good evidence that they are as magical as people say. But, until I see it, I’m not worrying much about it.

    @Greg

    Sustainable animal farming and sustainable agriculture are one in the same to me. Animals eat sustainable polycultures and we eat animals. Such as cows eating grasses and us eating cows. Is there a such thing as a ‘farm’ that supports perennial polycultures just for human consumption? Haven’t heard of this myself.

    I can’t speak for all those that are into paleo-nutrition but for me, the interesting part is the overly between anthropology and physiology – how strikingly they match up. I have no interest in distorting or romanticizing the past; we just interpret anthropology the best we can. Surely, anthropologists want more than just fellow anthropologists to learn from their work.

    Is this our permanent condition? No. But, the pieces that are changing are extremely small compared to that which is constant. If our environment demands our genome to change, then we will over hundreds of millennia. I don’t have that long to wait, though.

    Will Tigers ever evolve to eat grass like Cows? Well, maybe if we give them enough time. But, that is really not relevant because our physiology is what it is now.

    @Chris

    I once thought the same as you. I like cooking, I like variety. In experimenting, though, I found that consistency can be pretty damn enjoyable too.

    I don’t think there’s anything wrong with some veggies or berries. I do think that too often people use the excuse of variety as an excuse to not put all of their effort into making improvements in what they eat (not saying you do this).

    @Bret

    I like this: http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/expeller-pressed_coconut_oil.htm

    Expeller-pressed is cheaper and flavorless, good generic cooking oil. Gold label is delicious but a bit more expensive.

    • Dream January 13, 2010 at 2:24 am #

      @Nicky

      Dude, I’ve been meaning to respond to your comment since I first saw it posted. I’ll start out by saying thank you. As always a quality comment, that you obviously put a lot of time and effort into. I appreciate it big time man. It enhances the discussion ten fold, and takes a bit of (perhaps self created) pressure off me to answer each and every comment on here. Not only do you answer the questions of other readers (both those who have commented and those who have not), but you do it with an alternative viewpoint and tone, far less abrasive than my own! haha

      Anyway, on to your comment

      “When you are that deep in something, it’s easy to get stuck trying to find the perfect words.”

      >>>Oh god tell me about it man. I seriously have like half a dozen versions of this post sitting around, each one different than the next. Drove me nuts until I finally say down 8 hours straight to write it in the same frame of mind (rather than trying to chunk it together over different writing sessions).

      “I am amazed at how similar our paths have been. ”

      >>>Ha, ya, I get the same feeling whenever I talk with “Zebra” from the 2008 convention (and sometimes the reader known as “Dasani”). Not with nutrition necessarily, but most other walks of life. It’s really interesting to see happen (and cool haha).

      “If I had one suggestion it would be to more clearly assert that from the beginning. You write strongly which is probably an asset for you, but I think for many others, framing the article with your open-mindedness from the start might allow them to digest more of it.”

      >>>Hmm, probably not a bad idea to have put that earlier in the post. I’m not so sure about the very beginning (I’m concerned that would scare some people away, as in “wow this nut job was a vegan and now a carnivore?, must not know what he’s talking about”), but I agree that significantly earlier in the post would have been wise. Lesson learned!

      “Seriously, though, great article and it leaves a lot of open doors for you to go down with future articles which is great. Thanks for the motivation to get back to writing myself!”

      >>>Thanks for the kind words man, appreciate your comment. Regarding the rest of your comment, I support it 100% and would have left a “what this guy said” comment underneath it, had I been able to figure out how to modify where my comments are placed on the blog. I’ll comment on a few snippets however.

      “Lierre Keith, author of the Vegetarian Myth, thinks that the Earth could realistically support about 500 million humans. Dire indeed (and that could be as wrong as 15bill). But, like any population on Earth, ours will grow and be culled by the limitations of our environment.”

      >>>I wonder how she calculated that number? My bet is that the actual number is substantially higher than 500 million, but probably not even half of our current population. Then again, that’s gross guesstimation, who really knows? Regardless, I think the accurate number would skyrocket if we could change the way MOST people eat. Imagine a world where the diseases of civilization were non-existent, and horrendously inefficient/ineffective farming was obsolete? (due to a lack of government subsidies and plain ignorance). Think about how many hundreds of billions of dollars would free up without this nonsense being a part of every day life? Not even the end amount either, but the money that is freed up in process of moving towards a better way of eating? (the process of educating our peers and the free exchange of ideas). This is what is most interesting, and hopeful, for me. I have no idea what sort of innovation would arise from all that extra money that is essentially flushed down the toilet right now, but where there is a will, there is a way (or, I seriously hope so!). Who knows what tomorrow holds? As long as it’s not fake/cloned/artificial/synthetic garbage, I’m in! =)

      “True, the bran and the germ contain fiber and vitamins but the carbohydrate is exactly the same and has the exact same effect on the body.”

      >>>Your response to Harry was great, I will add here that many (perhaps most, or even all in some cases?) of the nutrients found in fiber, are locked up in fiber, and are therefore, quite literally, crapped out. This is an important distinction between eating animals and plants. You absorb animal products. Your body struggles to get much of anything useful from plants, especially when a plant is loaded with fiber (or, it’s nutrients are found there and not elsewhere).

      “Vegetables are so assumed to be healthy that no one backs up claims with physiological explanations.”

      >>>Important quote worth repeating.

      >>>Regarding your response to Greg (and assuming I didn’t already mention this, which I get the feeling I did), I will add that the adaptations required to digest grains/beans/copious amounts of carbohydrate, are too great. There has been no selective pressure to adapt to a high carbohydrate diet, we’ve just been shoving it down our throats for a while and suffering the associated problems.

      That’s all for now, thanks again Nicky!

      ps- if anyone has earlier questions not answered by Nicky, myself, or someone else at this point, please let me know and I’ll get to it

  23. Rex January 9, 2010 at 11:55 am #

    Great post Anthony. Do you have any thoughts on organ meats? In Weston Price’s research many of the primitive groups he studied consumed organs and believed they thrived because of this. Amazingly they even knew which particular organs to eat to prevent certain ailments. What especially caught my attention was the fact that captured tigers usually could not reproduce on a meat only diet, but once organs such as liver were added they had no problem reproducing. I’m curious to find out how essential they are for optimal health of humans. I will be experimenting with them very soon to see how much of an added benefit there is to eating them along with grass-fed meats.

    • Dream January 11, 2010 at 12:14 am #

      @Rex

      Haven’t tried many (if any) organ meats, but, I can’t imagine they have any magical properties. I think they would be useful in a situation where you only had access to lean meat though, as I imagine was the case with the tiger you mentioned. A diet too rich in protein is poisonous, and lacking in essential fatty acids, minerals, vitamins (for many carnivores, including humans).

      Eat plenty of fat and you should be good. If you like various organ meats…I say go for it. Just be careful eating liver (too much can lead to an OD on vitamin A).

      Let me know how the self experiment goes. I imagine some of them are quite tasty =)

  24. Oliver January 9, 2010 at 4:21 pm #

    Fantastic post. Thanks for writing.

  25. Bret January 9, 2010 at 11:14 pm #

    Hey Anthony are there any good books on this way of eating. Also my local store only has half and half and whipping cream. What’s better?

    • Dream January 11, 2010 at 12:10 am #

      @Bret

      Not specifically, no. The Primal Blueprint which I have reviewed (on this blog), and linked earlier in the comments of this post, isn’t bad, but it’s not exactly what I’ve proposed in this article. If you are new however, I highly recommend it.

      Beyond that it’s kind of a crap shoot with print books. Your best bet is the internet, mostly blogs. Check this comment for further reading and links

      http://www.thedreamlounge.net/2010/01/05/the-quest-for-nutritional-truth-why-i-eat-the-way-i-eat/#4183

      Regarding your local store, what do you mean by whipping cream? If it’s “heavy whipping cream”, then that’s what you are looking for, prefferably grass fed and non ultra pasteurized (it will say “ultra”). If it’s some other nonsense with sugar in it, pass. Half and half will suffice, but it has lactose in it. Keep looking for heavy whipping cream, it’s not that rare, I’m sure you’ll find it in some form.

      Google natural by nature. They are a good brand and can be found at many health food stores.

  26. Doc Holliday January 11, 2010 at 10:54 pm #

    First I’ll be honest and say I didn’t read the whole thing… But I found this really interesting and thought you would too.

    Anthony you should check out a documentary called King of Corn. It shows how the whole American diet actually starts with nutrient deficient corn – genetically engineered and grown with pesticides, herbicides, chemical fertilizers, etc.

    Of all corn grown about 15% goes to biofuel, and the rest to be turned into corn syrup or fed to animals. Most of the American diet is either made of corn syrup or meat.

    You’ve already cut out corn syrup but all the meat you’re eating is made of nutrient deficient corn. This sounds strange but if all the animal eats is corn then it is made of corn. To prove this you can test the Carbon of all the meat in your local supermarket and the Carbon will show that it came from corn. The same is true of American people. You are made of corn.. Nutrient deficient corn that’s been grown and treated with chemicals and then fed to an animal who’s been treated with more chemicals.

    If you take a piece of grass fed beef and a piece of corn fed beef the grass fed has about 20% more nutrition and less fat. Grass fed meat is more expensive and harder to find but at the first bite you notice the difference. And if it’s 20% better for you, you can eat 20% less which is still more than you need and will offset the price difference.

    Corn wasn’t always so bad though. About 100 years ago corn was a very different plant and much better for you. If you’ve ever seen “Indian” corn it’s much smaller and many different colors, not all yellow. But through selective breeding we’ve made corn into a very starchy food with almost no “germ.” The “germ” is the tougher and darker part of the corn that’s closest to the cobb and is where the corn is germinated, hence the name. The germ of any plant is full of vitamins (look up wheat germ). Over the years corn was bread to have a bulbous yellow ass of starch attached to a tiny germ… bigger corn but also much fattier and with almost no nutrition.

    You are what you eat and what you eat is what it eats and… you get the idea. Follow your food back to where it was grown/made and unfortunately you’ll usually be unpleasantly surprised.

    • Dream January 12, 2010 at 1:45 pm #

      @Doc

      Where have you been man? We miss the doc! haha

      “Anthony you should check out a documentary called King of Corn. It shows how the whole American diet actually starts with nutrient deficient corn – genetically engineered and grown with pesticides, herbicides, chemical fertilizers, etc.”

      >>>>I’ve seen it, and am (somewhat) well read on the subject. I agree, most people just eat derivatives of corn all day. I’m pretty sure I mentioned this in the mammoth article written above actually (maybe not?).

      “You’ve already cut out corn syrup but all the meat you’re eating is made of nutrient deficient corn.”

      >>>Most of the animal products I eat have little or no corn ever fed to the original animal, including heavy cream, chicken eggs, and various forms of animal flesh. That said, I don’t think it’s the end of the world in a nutritional sense eating animal products that have been fed corn/soy for some amount of time. It’s horrible for the environment on a grand scale, yes, but as long as the vast majority of the animals you eat digest no corn/soy and other non sense, I think you’re in the clear. No one is perfect, and stressing about eating conventional meat on occasion is probably less healthy than eating it is.

      “If you take a piece of grass fed beef and a piece of corn fed beef the grass fed has about 20% more nutrition and less fat. Grass fed meat is more expensive and harder to find but at the first bite you notice the difference. And if it’s 20% better for you, you can eat 20% less which is still more than you need and will offset the price difference.”

      >>>I’m not sure about the specifics listed here, but yes, pasture fed and finished meats are superior to corn/soy fed meats. This was discussed in the original post.

      “Corn wasn’t always so bad though. ”

      >>>Eh, I disagree on this one. As far as I’m concerned “corn” should be eradicated from the planet. To do so, all we would have to do is stop cultivating it since the plant lacks the ability to sustain itself without human intervention. Strange thing for a “natural” plant wouldn’t you say?

  27. A January 12, 2010 at 5:14 pm #

    good stuff Anthony, appreciate your thoughts.
    my diet experimentation is almost exactly like yours…SAD, vegetarian, vegan, raw foodist, now paleo.
    Primal eating works better than all the others (so far).

    – I have never been fat never had food issues, so people wonder why i am so obsessed with diet…I just want the truth. I have found the truth early on in many disciplines, religion, politics, psychology, etc.. – only nutrition has stumped me, but I think in going primal, i am finally getting close to the truth. its about time.

  28. Shane January 12, 2010 at 6:54 pm #

    I’ve been eating a diet of only meat for close to three months now however I seem to have run into a problem.I pretty much eat only steaks, but I’m unable to stomach the fat at all,as in if I even put it in my mouth and end up gagging and nearly throwing up.So I don’t think I’m getting anywhere near enough fat which would explain why I still crave carbs a lot and fat loss appeared to stop after the first few weeks.Any ideas what I can do to get more fat in or a way to make the beef fat more palatable? I’m going to try making pemmican however I can’t find any butchers that have any supplies of fat where I am(Ireland) so for now that seems to be out of the question.I’m going to try and look for the heavy cream you advocated,though I’ve never heard of it before.

  29. Shane January 12, 2010 at 7:31 pm #

    Also, when making pemmican,Is it ok for instance to mix lamb fat and beef fat?

  30. Teodor Lazar January 12, 2010 at 10:58 pm #

    Anthony, I can’t fathom that you believe that eating loads of meat and heavy cream is healthy for you. After all you’ve read, that the conclusion you’ve come to? That’s what you’ve decided is the ideal diet?

    Also, I have to pull the BS alarm. WHEN DID YOU TRY BEING VEGAN? For how long? You say you dabbled in vegan foods? For a day or two? When you were a baby? When?

    You are entitled to your view, but I’m telling you…if you tried raw foods for one month you would never go back to your meaty ways!

    • Dream January 13, 2010 at 3:03 am #

      @Teodor Lazar

      “Anthony, I can’t fathom that you believe that eating loads of meat and heavy cream is healthy for you. After all you’ve read, that the conclusion you’ve come to? That’s what you’ve decided is the ideal diet?”

      >>>The way I have chosen to eat is not a matter of “belief”, superstition, social pressure, or other superficial nonsense. It’s a matter of fact, applied logic, rational thought, and reason (and probably a little guess work too as I’m not “god”, perfect, or infallible, only human). So yes, after the thousands of hours I have spent reading about the subject of nutrition, and more dietary changes than I care to count, this is where I am at. Considering this, most seem to find it intriguing and are curious to learn more (if they had not already begun to do so on their own beforehand), not quick to condemn and block out any and all personal changes this post may suggest, as you’ve done here with the “fathom”, and real life comments I’ve heard from you.

      “Also, I have to pull the BS alarm. WHEN DID YOU TRY BEING VEGAN? For how long? You say you dabbled in vegan foods? For a day or two? When you were a baby? When?”

      >>>I’m baffled by this comment. I’ve gone multiple months in a row without a single animal product in my diet, and nearly 2 years without eating any meat except that found in the fish I caught, cleaned, and cooked myself. I could probably count the number of fish I ate during that time span with my fingers. Friends and relatives to this day still think I’ve “vegan” or “vegetarian”. Boy the look on their faces is priceless when I pass on the veggies and stick to only meat! All of this is clearly expressed in my old blogspot blog @ http://thedreamlounge.blogspot.com . One of my former room mates (Max Orelus) also commented on this very post at the dramatic change in dietary thinking he has seen in this post, in comparison to the ~year we lived together at “Project Orlando”. Jared “Ratisse” Dwyer of T21C fame will also attest to my dietary habits. But you already knew this, so I question your motive for asking in the first place? Why attack me instead of the ideas and arguments I presented?

      *”Two truly rational men have no disagreements”*

      “You are entitled to your view, but I’m telling you…if you tried raw foods for one month you would never go back to your meaty ways!”

      >>>The book I gave to you as a wedding gift completely and utterly debunks the notion that “raw foods” are somehow superior to cooked foods. They are not, in any way shape or form. In fact eating a “raw diet” of mostly or all plants is one of the most caloric ally restrictive and nutritionally deficient “diets” one could ever come up with. Eating in such a way completely disregards our evolution, and the fundamental chemistry/biology behind our digestive systems. I implore you to read the book “Catching Fire” that I gave you, for you and your families sake.

  31. Dream January 13, 2010 at 2:29 am #

    @A

    “- I have never been fat never had food issues, so people wonder why i am so obsessed with diet…I just want the truth.”

    Same here man. We’re a generation starving for truth. It’s time we find some. To hell with bull $hit! =)

  32. Dream January 13, 2010 at 2:35 am #

    @Shane

    “I pretty much eat only steaks, but I’m unable to stomach the fat at all,as in if I even put it in my mouth and end up gagging and nearly throwing up.So I don’t think I’m getting anywhere near enough fat which would explain why I still crave carbs a lot and fat loss appeared to stop after the first few weeks.”

    >>My guess is that you are getting enough fat as it is, assuming you like the taste of steak fat to begin with and are not rejecting it on taste alone (which it does not sound like you are). In any case, eating lots of heavy cream, or piling butter/ghee on top of your meats will skyrocket your fat intake. You can also try frying your steaks in coconut oil and butter, and then pouring even more on top of it. I do this every so often, tastes great! Also, try contacting Danny Roddy at CarnivoreHealth.com . He’s well versed in your specific style of eating.

    >>>As for finding beef fat, not many will have it sitting around. Try calling in a few days in advance and asking if they can stockpile some over the course of a few days. I’m doing this in Orlando at a local Whole foods for example. Might take a few days, but they should be able to save you some up.

    >>>>As for using multiple animal fats… I suppose it’s worth a shot, but I have read using fat and protein from the same animal is the best way to make pemmican. I’m still a newbie with it though, so I say go for it and see how it tastes! In the case of long term storage/stockpiling I probably wouldn’t mess with it though. Keep it simple =)

  33. Claire January 13, 2010 at 1:58 pm #

    Great post Anthony. I would consider myself a carnivore, especially given my change in diet over the last month. I do eat some berries, a little celery, and a few almonds here and there, but I’m always well below 50 grams in carbohydrate unless it’s someone’s birthday or something.

    My family’s still telling me I’m going to die though, but I’m going to do what you said, and lead by example. My grandmother told me eating 8 eggs a day would make me pee out blood, and that drinking whole milk after eating wild caught fish turns your skin white. She’s also part of a religion that prevents her from eating meat. A religion I’m technically supposed to be “a part” of :/

    • Dream January 16, 2010 at 1:55 pm #

      @Claire

      Dang, sounds like you have your work cut out for you! What “religion” is your grandmother if you don’t mind me asking? I’m not familiar with too many that entirely abstain from meat, year round.

      Anyway, I’m sure you already know this, but it’s worth saying- eggs will not make you pee blood, and milk won’t make your skin turn white! Although, I think heavy cream is much better than milk =).

      Keep beating your drums and living your life the way you see fit, and I’ll do the same. Good luck

  34. Doc Holliday January 13, 2010 at 2:51 pm #

    Hey Anthony! Yeah for the most part I’m off the radar but still check some friend’s blogs from time to time. I went back and fully read your post.

    I also went back and saw a post you did on grass fed meat. It’s awesome you’re questioning the food system, the more I look into it the more disgusted I am with it. Is water next? I know you have that special bottle. Do you know if it filters out really small stuff like hormones, pharmaceutical drugs, etc? Basically the stuff you normally need an entire house clay filter for?

    If you don’t already have one you should invest in a shower filter. They’re pretty cheap and skin is very porous. I’ve seen some data that says the water we bathe in, especially when it’s 2 15 minute showers a day, is how we absorb most of the bad shit in our treated water.

    Shoot me an email dude I don’t know your contact info anymore

    • Dream January 16, 2010 at 1:52 pm #

      @Doc Holiday

      Hey man, I posted more about the bottle here

      http://www.thedreamlounge.net/2009/10/10/life-saver-water-bottle-review/

      And there is additional discussion in the comments. It filters most “bad stuff” out, but not everything. Most importantly, it makes virtually any fresh water you put in it, sterile for drinking purposes.

      My e-mail is dream at the21convention.com

      What a shocker right? haha

  35. Bret January 13, 2010 at 4:48 pm #

    Ok thanks Anthony. The cream I found is called 35% whipping cream by Beatrice. Ingredients are cream,milk,carrageenan. 800 cals per 1 cup.

    • Dream January 16, 2010 at 1:49 pm #

      @Bret

      Very cool man, so it’s all fat right? It should read “0” grams of protein and carbohydrate (even though that’s technically not true). If it has “milk” though, I’m not so sure you found the right stuff, it sounds more like half/half. Also, try to find a brand without carrageenan if possible.

  36. Claire January 17, 2010 at 5:53 pm #

    @Dream

    The religion my grandmother is a part of is Sikhism, but you only have to abstain from meat if you’ve been baptized, which I haven’t been. (still not allowed to eat cows, pigs, or things that resemble cows and pigs though)

    I’ve accepted my role as the black sheep of the family :]

  37. Al January 18, 2010 at 5:33 pm #

    Anthony,

    Excuse me if I missed this, but how many ounces of meat per day do you typically eat?

    Al

  38. Dream January 19, 2010 at 2:54 am #

    @Al

    I eat a horrendous amount of food every day. At least 2 pounds of meat, heavy cream, and sometimes eggs.

    Usually more, although I could probably get by on a pound a day just fine.

  39. Brett January 20, 2010 at 2:41 pm #

    Anthony you mention muscle building in your article…it has to do with caloric intake, perhaps you can expand on that in a new article. i have experimented with different diets over the years and different ways of lifting, H.I.T, etc… and the one consistent factor in decent muscle gain, im talking size here, hypertrophy, has been the amount of food i eat.I lifted for years, gained some decent strength, but never really blew up in size, and my strength gains plateaued, only more food, more protein, pushed me bigger. as far as im concerned the only thing holding me back in adding lots of muscle mass, is the lack of an enormous appetite, hard intense lifting is the easy part.

    • Dream January 20, 2010 at 6:56 pm #

      @Brett

      The next two topics I intend to discuss on TDL concerning nutrition are A. calorie intake as it relates to muscle mass, and B. how important protein really is.

      (Come to think of it, I may combine these two ideas into one post.)

      But ya, my conclusion at the moment is that calorie intake is a huge factor in muscle growth, moreso than protein intake, and even the exercise stimulus itself. “Calorie” is a tricky word though, since that could include carbohydrate, and excessive amounts of protein. By “calorie intake”, if it’s not apparent by now, I am mostly referring to fat intake, which most would find ridiculous for muscular hypertrophy, but in fact, I am quite serious, in addition to my personal experience reflecting this.

      I think this even holds true for those who do not have enormous appetites like myself. Fat is a miraculous thing…carbohydrate isn’t very helpful…protein is required, but not in insane quantities =)

      More to come, thanks for bringing it up!

      -Anthony

  40. dave January 21, 2010 at 6:51 pm #

    Well, I can’t say that I read the whole post, but I’ve been around long enough and I’ve read enough on the subject to understand your point.

    I think, like with your exercise posts, it’s dangerous to promote one dogmatic view at the expense of other, equally valid points of view. I completely agree with the belief (fact, in my OPINION) that corn and many grains are far too ubiquitous in our world, it is also a fact (bona fide) that the land used for beef production for use in the U.S. alone (much going to fast food “restaurants”) could feed a large portion of the world if used for plant based foods (preferably other than the villainous corn). So, unless we’re going to jettison the industrial farms (of all kinds and stripes) there isn’t a simple answer, and that includes going to an all meat diet. Where is all this meat going to come from? This, especially in the quantities you claim to consume, would quickly deplete our meat supply, unless you advocate the use of drugs and steroids to keep disease down and growth rate up. I’m assuming you don’t.

    My point is that, again, like your fitness related posts, ignoring many valid points of view in favor of a one-size-fits-all view is tough to swallow. I’d be willing to bet that you (as I was at many different points in my life) were equally as dogmatic about other lifestyle choices to which you subscribed in the past, and from which you have now moved on.

    People come in many shapes and sizes with different needs…that includes what they require, enjoy, and can handle in the fitness and nutritional fields.

    I like your posts, they sound a lot like my thoughts when I was your age…I just caution anyone reading them that they should do all their own research and find their own path, much like many of us have done.

    Anyway, your posts are fairly enjoyable (if a bit long-winded and plump with grammatical errors, but you seem like a reasonably smart guy so in time I’m sure you’ll get better)…just sprinkle in a bit of humility once in a while, I guarantee by the time you’re in your 30s or 40s your views will change, if only a little bit.

    • Dream January 26, 2010 at 10:39 pm #

      Dave I suggest you read the entire post, since the end in particular gets to the nitty gritty and finer points (a little less long winded, as you say).

      ” it is also a fact (bona fide) that the land used for beef production for use in the U.S. alone (much going to fast food “restaurants”) could feed a large portion of the world if used for plant based foods (preferably other than the villainous corn)”

      While I would welcome the demise of corn, I strongly disagree that “the US alone could feed a large portion of the world”. I disagree with it on the grounds that it is a HORRIBLE idea that we should, or that it is beneficial, for us to “feed” the rest of the world. The heavily subsidized agri-business of the US destroys local food economies when imported to third world countries, making them ever more dependent on the US, for their food, and progressively less self sufficient.

      “Where is all this meat going to come from?”

      All the land wasted on corn, soy, and wheat- which are rapidly destroying our topsoil as Nicky previously mentioned. I dont think the whole planet needs to ONLY eat meat though, and it was not my intention to convery such a message in this article. I do think it’s best for “most” people to eat “mostly” animals though. “Animals” is a lot broader term than “meat”, and “most” certainly doesn’t mean we should stop growing other crops. I for one, like coffee =).

      Perhaps a better way to word this is that society would benefit from a fundamental shift in thinking about what “food” is – “food” being animals, with plants being medicine, condiments, or a less than optimal substitute for animals (“plants” of course excludes corn, soy, wheat, etc).

      “My point is that, again, like your fitness related posts, ignoring many valid points of view in favor of a one-size-fits-all view is tough to swallow. I’d be willing to bet that you (as I was at many different points in my life) were equally as dogmatic about other lifestyle choices to which you subscribed in the past, and from which you have now moved on.”

      You are dead on in this post regarding the dogmatic view points throughout my life, however, I am in search of truth, and wont exclude “extreme” view points, just because they seem extreme, from some perspectives. If anything, going through the range of “extremes” I have been though, helps put a birds eye view on a topic as critical as nutrition and exercise, and what’s really “extreme”, and what just seems that way at first.

      “People come in many shapes and sizes with different needs…that includes what they require, enjoy, and can handle in the fitness and nutritional fields.”

      I agree, but people are people, human beings are human beings. We differ, but only so much. So, as I’ve said before about exercise, the specifics may very from individual to individual, but the principles are universal and apply regardless of ethnicity, gender, goals, and so on.

      “I like your posts, they sound a lot like my thoughts when I was your age…I just caution anyone reading them that they should do all their own research and find their own path, much like many of us have done.”

      Again, I agree, and encourage everyone, consistently (including in this post), to think for themselves, challenge conventional wisdom, and listen to their own judgement. It is of a paramount importance, regardless of the subject.

      “Anyway, your posts are fairly enjoyable (if a bit long-winded and plump with grammatical errors, but you seem like a reasonably smart guy so in time I’m sure you’ll get better)…just sprinkle in a bit of humility once in a while, I guarantee by the time you’re in your 30s or 40s your views will change, if only a little bit.”

      I would be disappointed if my views didn’t change, but like you suggested, just how much will they? As I breifly mentioned in the post, where can my dietary habits go from here? There simply aren’t a lot of significant options left. Small changes, yes, but nothing massive like going from entirely vegan to nearly 100% carnivorous.

      As for the grammar… I do what I can. This is a free blog. I am not paid, and make very little money from it. I do it for myself first and foremost, and second to help others (which paradoxically, by my personal logic, could be swapped into first place, as I view helping others the same as helping myself).

      In any case, I do not claim to be a professional writer, and don’t care to be at the moment. As long as my points are clear for most, I am satisfied.

  41. Donnie Hunt January 24, 2010 at 1:10 pm #

    I’ll have to sit down when and read this post in full when I have the time. I can say from experience when I’ve tried to go without eating meat I do not feel right. I get headaches. Nothing seems to satisfy hunger like meat.

  42. Al Coleman January 27, 2010 at 6:05 pm #

    Hey Anthony,

    How much money would you say you spend on meat per week? Just curious. I’m trying to budget.

    Al

    • Dream January 27, 2010 at 8:49 pm #

      Hmm, don’t think of it in terms of “weeks” much, just day by day (sort of how my brain works).

      I spend anywhere from about 10-17 dollars a day though on “food”. Can be less, can be more, depending on what and how much I eat. That’s a pretty good dollar range though.

      x7 that is… 70-119 dollars a week

      That includes grass fed heavy cream, coffee, cheese, eggs (very economical), meat, and butter, consistently. Sometimes I buy in bulk though, such as with coconut oil and butter (I still have frozen butter from over a month ago, and some ghee, which is clarified butter).

      hope this helped

      -Anthony

      • Dan January 27, 2010 at 10:19 pm #

        Would it be okay to eat eggs or lamb 4-5 times a week or would a variety be more desirable?

        Also, I ended up finding and eating the lamb from Publix. It ended up tasting great!

        • Dream January 27, 2010 at 11:58 pm #

          Ya isn’t the lamb awesome? haha

          Don’t worry about “variety”. While I find it “good” to eat a variety of animals, I don’t think it’s something to worry about. A mental itch for novelty alone should be sufficient to change what animal products you eat, perhaps even unknowingly. For example getting “bored” of eggs, and eating more poultry or “red” meat, only to return to eating lots of eggs not a month later.

  43. Al Coleman January 27, 2010 at 11:24 pm #

    Anthony,

    That does help! Thanks.

    Al

    • Dream January 27, 2010 at 11:58 pm #

      Np man, thanks for dropping in and adding to the discussion.

  44. Chris Cash February 27, 2010 at 1:44 am #

    Brock Lesnar supposedly had mainly a carnivorous diet when he ran into his recent health problems. What are your thoughts/opinions on that?

    • Dream February 27, 2010 at 4:23 am #

      From what BodyBuilding.com is telling me about his “diet” and exercise program, the poor guy doesn’t have a clue what he’s doing. The physical activity he performed had little benefit for his “health”, and may have well contributed to whatever illness he recently suffered.

      Brock also appeared to take a considerable amount of “supplements”, which I assume, were all crap that he didn’t need, and didn’t do anything good for him. These may have also played a role in whatever problems he recently suffered, especially in combination with the junk he likely ate (that I can only assume he did).

      Regarding his actual diet, the fact that he ate animals had nothing to do with any health problems he suffered. Zero. From the looks of it, the guys seems kind of flabby/chubby, typical of an athlete with his genetics really “pushing himself”. I’m betting his insulin levels were sky high, his body in a constantly inflamed state of over training, and his carbohydrate intake at least moderately high.

      I did just find another article about his recent gut problems and “poor diet”, oh god. It’s very sad to see this guys head filled with more non sense now that he has had problems from eating junk. Whatever nutritionist idiot told this guy his diet was too high in protein and too low in fiber needs to get his bell rung in a UFC fight and immediately stop giving people advice on what to eat.

  45. JEFF March 16, 2010 at 2:02 am #

    Whatup, Dream! I’m glad to see others my age who are actually proactive about understanding nutrition ( :

    On that note, you still have a lot to learn man. As do I. Nutrition is an art, just as complex as any other high-caliber art form.

    As far as macronutrients go I thrive on carbohydrate as my main energy source. Natural starches including plantains, yams and squash dominate my diet. You should look into metabolic typing, to further increase your knowledge. We definitely ALL need proteins for tissue-repair. With that said, metabolism determines wether we thrive on carbohydrate OR fats as our main energy source. Not everyone thrives solely on fats!

    As far as foods, I completely disagree with your view on animals as the ONLY source. I can tell you have definitely studied the lack luster paleo diet! For myself, I consume plants AND animals with plants as the staple. I do agree that animals make a great food source. In turn, I won’t touch the standard commercial animal-products as these are far from optimal choices. I would much prefer to hunt wild, natural game like elk or ostrich as my animal choices. One good elk should last for a month or two. Ideally as humans, we will get the most out of an animal who could actually eat us. Like a lion. I desire to consume a lion. After all, we are what we eat. Why not make it to the top of the food chain? Lion meat, would be bomb.

    Dairy is not an ideal food choice. It is made by cows for their calves who are in the infantry stage. These calves are too young to find foods on their own, and therefore must drink their mother’s milk, straight from the source. As for humans, breast-milk is the far superior-choice as it is tailor-made for our species. Only I’m not going to drink that shit ha ha. It is VERY nutritious, though only necessary for infants.

    So much to talk about, in this vast subject.

    P.S. None the less, good article man. I like some of your points and insights.

    JEFF

    • Dream March 16, 2010 at 7:20 pm #

      I agree we all must continue to learn and I’m glad you enjoyed the article.

      Couple points

      1. Metabolic typing has no basis in science or reality. I’ve looked at it, and I find it as valid as vegetarianism.

      2. Carbohydrate is not inherently evil, but it is a inferior source of energy as compared to fat, especially saturated. Humans are meant to dip in and out of ketosis, or stay there the majority of their lives. I’ve lived in the wild and find it ridiculous to think otherwise.

      3. Animals are not the only source of real food. I do not believe I stated this in the article. Animals are just always going to be superior to plants. Many “plants” we eat today are not “food” either, as discussed in the article.

      4. “Wild” game is probably not as ideal as pasture raised animals. Wild game is prone to parasites and other problems. It’s certainly better than grain fed animals, but a romantic fantasy none the less. I would be interested in eating “lion”, but then again I suspect the texture may be horrible to humans.

      5. “Dairy” is a very broad term. For the record, I don’t support “dairy”. I primarily support dairy fat, and the protein to a lesser extent. Some people can tolerate the carbohydrate from milk, but I do not believe it does anyone, any good, at all. You’re arguments against milk regarding it being made for baby cows is irrelevant, as their meat is not meant solely for our consumption either.

      I suggest checking out http://www.paleonu.com for further info on what I’ve written above.

      • JEFF March 16, 2010 at 11:58 pm #

        Either way, I personally thrive on natural carbohydrate.

        I have tried your preached ‘ketosis’ and perform much more poorly in anaerobic-sport competition when in this process. I THRIVE on carbohydrate. I agree SOME benefit, from ‘ketosis’. Others like myself, perform much more consistenly on carbohydrate. It all depends on the person.

        With that said, carbohydrates never caused Diabetes for ANYONE. Chemical sugars like high-fructose corn syrup and refined starches, did. This is obvious as carbohydrate have existed for millions of years while diabetes did not originate until ~2,000 years ago. Recently over the summer, my best-friend died. I totally understand where you’re coming from as it took an emotional toll on me. On that note, you need to put your emotions aside as the aversion to carbohydrate you yield is absolutely rediculous. After all, why would these exist if they did not have a prolonged dietetic purpose?

        I also agree ‘animals’ will always be a better-food choice. Point taken, this does NOT include feed lot animals! I’m talking wild-caught fish and game. If these cannot be caught, then plants make a legit supplement until real animal-meat can be obtained.

        As far as the debate on feed lot versus wild-caught animals, your argument is not even worth mentioning. A wild animal capable of surviving on it’s own is ALWAYS a better food-source compared to a dependently raised animal.

        And that bring us to the final topic. Saturated fats. And ‘dairy’– also known as cow sourced products. You don’t support dairy yet you support ‘dairy fats’? Wow, talk about a contradiction! You are absolutely correct in stating that my point of milk being for baby cows is irrelevant. That is not what I was suggesting. The point I am making is I am no longer a baby and therefore do not drink milk. Milk is made for infants, regardless of species. PERIOD. Maybe you were not breast-fed enough, in younger years?

        I respectfully suggest that you browse through Superior Nutrition by Shelton in order to gain more insight. One of the few print-books worth mentioning. In turn, I will check out the website you suggested.

        P.S. Everyone knows saturated fats have documented proof of being counter productive. Unless of course these fats are in the form of medium-chain tryglycerides.

        • Dream March 17, 2010 at 3:39 pm #

          Going to use this for tomorrows post. Is this OK with you?

          • JEFF March 17, 2010 at 10:12 pm #

            Yes. Good-competition.

          • jaYOST7 October 5, 2010 at 6:48 pm #

            The “paleo diet” is SYNONYMOUS with the Misinformation Effect.

  46. Philip October 20, 2010 at 12:46 pm #

    There is so much wrong with this post I have a hard time believing you’re not just trolling.

    One thing I’ll point out is that the “We’ve been carnivores for millions of years!” argument is flat out wrong. Early humans mainly scavenged for food, and when they hunted it was mostly small game through trapping and baiting. The early human diet likely consisted of a 4/1 plant to meat ratio.

    Peoples who consisted solely on meat (such as the Inuit) tend to be the minority, and are often restricted to harsh, brutal environments where not as much vegetative matter is able to grow.

    • Anthony 'Dream' Johnson October 20, 2010 at 3:58 pm #

      Hmm…. yea…. no.

      Go eat some meat and eggs. Youll thank me later.

      • Philip October 21, 2010 at 1:14 pm #

        I never said I don’t eat meat. But I’m not pretending that they are healthier than a bowl of Shredded Wheat. Meat is fine and good — in moderation. Civilization is literally build on cereal grains.

        • Anthony 'Dream' Johnson October 21, 2010 at 1:21 pm #

          You just had to use shredded wheat as an example… yikes. That’s funny for the wrong reasons.

  47. Xavier January 9, 2011 at 5:57 pm #

    You state some strong opinions, many of these opinions you think to be facts. You seem to ramble through your “essay” without proving anything. For instance, stating that vegans and vegetarians are the biggest contributors to animal cruelty and environmental damage without any conclusive evidence following such a statement is to say the least immature and irresponsible of you. As you lack evidence on so many counts in such a lackluster essay, one can take your words with a grain of salt, which i know is not your intent of this essay. You are kidding yourself when you think that a high intake of animal products is better for you and the planet. The sheer volume of farmed animals Humans eat can only be produced by industrial farming, which means the sustainable farming you so press for is unattainable unless humans dramatically lower their intake of farmed animals, the very opposite of the diet you campaign for. Even if Humans somehow stopped industrial farming and switched to small, “sustainable” farming globally, the supply would not meet the demand, and biodiversity of animals and plants would dramatically decrease with the expansion, spread, and invasion of Farmed animals into this land. It would demand humans to increase acreage for farmed animals in a “Sustainable”, cruelty free Farming structure, thereby decreasing acreage of wild animals at a time their habitats are already shrinking dramatically. It would also decrease plant diversity in the spread of grass to feed such animals naturally (As you so want), clearing acres upon acres of Forested area as it does now. Decreasing biodiversity is a cause for global collapse for not only humans, but all animals and plants, and eating more animals you insanely recommend will result in the same loss of biodiversity as monoculture does now.

    Do you not see your idealistic folly?

    hoping you read this message,

    xavier

  48. will January 29, 2011 at 4:39 pm #

    Hey Dream, (Fantastic blog you have here)

    I have practice for gymnastics in about an hour so I am hoping you can respond to my question within an hour, but I respect that you have things in your life to do as well.

    Here goes:
    Does Exercise help if you are feeling sick? I am talking coughing, mucus throat, and feelings of weakness throughout my body. Not sure if you posted about it, but I would really like a link or an answer.

    William

  49. Sydney April 8, 2011 at 8:02 pm #

    Anthony,
    It looks like It’s been a little while since you posted this, but I have a question for you. What was it that made you change from “paleo vegan” to eating animal products again? I have followed a very similar dietary path as yours, and am currently a year into veganism(for ethical reasons), and a few months into paleo-style veganism. I have been questioning my diet recently, however, mostly concerning the long-term sustainability of it towards my health. I have been considering incorporating humane animal products back into my diet, but am still gathering information.

    • James Steele II April 9, 2011 at 11:13 am #

      If I might make a suggestion. Read Lierre Keiths The Vegetarian Myth. If you aren’t already aware, this book will show you the fallacy of the ethical or moral vegans.

      • Anthony Dream Johnson April 9, 2011 at 7:59 pm #

        Like James said, read TVM. If that doesn’t hurtle you over the intellectual gap, nothing will.

    • jaYOST7 April 9, 2011 at 4:53 pm #

      Dude. Animals are CRUCIAL in our diets. Proof: Look at your teeth, you’re a carnivore. Plants are great and necessary (vegan is ALL plant.) but animals affect and nourish us in different ways, beyond complete proteins, lean omega-fats and B vitamins. They truly complement the plant.

      TO SUM IT UP: You should include and eat plenty of plant AND animal foods, in your diet, for proper nourishment and hormone production.

  50. Branden April 15, 2011 at 1:53 am #

    “No, you do not need them. Can foods packed with them be beneficial? Maybe, maybe not. I really don’t have the answer.”

    This is what you said in relation to plants and anti-oxidants. If you dont have an answer about them being beneficial or not how can you say that they aren’t good for you or that you dont need them?

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